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Species Collapse via Hybridization in Darwin's Tree Finches

Kleindorfer, Sonia; O'Connor, Jody A.; Dudaniec, Rachael LU ; Myers, Steven A.; Robertson, Jeremy and Sulloway, Frank J. (2014) In American Naturalist 183(3). p.325-341
Abstract
Species hybridization can lead to fitness costs, species collapse, and novel evolutionary trajectories in changing environments. Hybridization is predicted to be more common when environmental conditions change rapidly. Here, we test patterns of hybridization in three sympatric tree finch species (small tree finch Camarhynchus parvulus, medium tree finch Camarhynchus pauper, and large tree finch: Camarhynchus psittacula) that are currently recognized on Floreana Island, Galaapagos Archipelago. Genetic analysis of microsatellite data from contemporary samples showed two genetic populations and one hybrid cluster in both 2005 and 2010; hybrid individuals were derived from genetic population 1 (small morph) and genetic population 2 (large... (More)
Species hybridization can lead to fitness costs, species collapse, and novel evolutionary trajectories in changing environments. Hybridization is predicted to be more common when environmental conditions change rapidly. Here, we test patterns of hybridization in three sympatric tree finch species (small tree finch Camarhynchus parvulus, medium tree finch Camarhynchus pauper, and large tree finch: Camarhynchus psittacula) that are currently recognized on Floreana Island, Galaapagos Archipelago. Genetic analysis of microsatellite data from contemporary samples showed two genetic populations and one hybrid cluster in both 2005 and 2010; hybrid individuals were derived from genetic population 1 (small morph) and genetic population 2 (large morph). Females of the large and rare species were more likely to pair with males of the small common species. Finch populations differed in morphology in 1852--1906 compared with 2005/2010. An unsupervised clustering method showed (a) support for three morphological clusters in the historical tree finch sample (1852--1906), which is consistent with current species recognition; (b) support for two or three morphological clusters in 2005 with some (19%) hybridization; and (c) support for just two morphological clusters in 2010 with frequent (41%) hybridization. We discuss these findings in relation to species demarcations of Camarhynchus tree finches on Floreana Island. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Camarhynchus, Philornis downsi, parasite, mate choice, disassortative, pairing, asymmetric reproductive isolation
in
American Naturalist
volume
183
issue
3
pages
325 - 341
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000331599200005
  • scopus:84894359209
ISSN
0003-0147
DOI
10.1086/674899
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2cfe2716-9044-4b43-859d-6528aaae70f1 (old id 4417586)
date added to LUP
2014-04-30 11:58:36
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:21:58
@article{2cfe2716-9044-4b43-859d-6528aaae70f1,
  abstract     = {Species hybridization can lead to fitness costs, species collapse, and novel evolutionary trajectories in changing environments. Hybridization is predicted to be more common when environmental conditions change rapidly. Here, we test patterns of hybridization in three sympatric tree finch species (small tree finch Camarhynchus parvulus, medium tree finch Camarhynchus pauper, and large tree finch: Camarhynchus psittacula) that are currently recognized on Floreana Island, Galaapagos Archipelago. Genetic analysis of microsatellite data from contemporary samples showed two genetic populations and one hybrid cluster in both 2005 and 2010; hybrid individuals were derived from genetic population 1 (small morph) and genetic population 2 (large morph). Females of the large and rare species were more likely to pair with males of the small common species. Finch populations differed in morphology in 1852--1906 compared with 2005/2010. An unsupervised clustering method showed (a) support for three morphological clusters in the historical tree finch sample (1852--1906), which is consistent with current species recognition; (b) support for two or three morphological clusters in 2005 with some (19%) hybridization; and (c) support for just two morphological clusters in 2010 with frequent (41%) hybridization. We discuss these findings in relation to species demarcations of Camarhynchus tree finches on Floreana Island.},
  author       = {Kleindorfer, Sonia and O'Connor, Jody A. and Dudaniec, Rachael and Myers, Steven A. and Robertson, Jeremy and Sulloway, Frank J.},
  issn         = {0003-0147},
  keyword      = {Camarhynchus,Philornis downsi,parasite,mate choice,disassortative,pairing,asymmetric reproductive isolation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {325--341},
  publisher    = {University of Chicago Press},
  series       = {American Naturalist},
  title        = {Species Collapse via Hybridization in Darwin's Tree Finches},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/674899},
  volume       = {183},
  year         = {2014},
}