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Exosome and microvesicle mediated phene transfer in mammalian cells.

Christianson, Helena LU ; Svensson, Katrin LU and Belting, Mattias LU (2014) In Seminars in Cancer Biology 28(Apr 23). p.31-38
Abstract
Extracellular vesicles (EVs), e.g. exosomes and microvesicles, emerge as new signaling organelles in the exchange of information between cells at the paracrine and systemic level. It is clear that these virus like particles carry complex biological information that can elicit a pleiotropic response in recipient cells with potential relevance in physiology as well as in cancer and other pathological conditions. Numerous studies convincingly show that the molecular composition of EVs closely reflects their cell or tissue of origin. Thus, the signaling status of donor cells, more specifically their endosomal compartments, may largely determine the biological output in recipient cells, a process that we then may conceptualize as vesicle... (More)
Extracellular vesicles (EVs), e.g. exosomes and microvesicles, emerge as new signaling organelles in the exchange of information between cells at the paracrine and systemic level. It is clear that these virus like particles carry complex biological information that can elicit a pleiotropic response in recipient cells with potential relevance in physiology as well as in cancer and other pathological conditions. Numerous studies convincingly show that the molecular composition of EVs closely reflects their cell or tissue of origin. Thus, the signaling status of donor cells, more specifically their endosomal compartments, may largely determine the biological output in recipient cells, a process that we then may conceptualize as vesicle mediated phene transfer. Whereas more conventional modes of cell-cell communication mostly depend on extracellular ligand concentration and cell-surface receptor availability, the magnitude of the EV signaling response relies on the capture and uptake by target cells, allowing release of the EV content. Numerous reports point at the intriguing possibility that, among thousands of mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins, single EV constituents effectuate the biological response, e.g. stimulation of angiogenesis and cancer cell metastasis, in recipient cells; however, we find it conceivable that strategies targeted at general mechanisms of EV function should provide more rational avenues for therapeutic intervention directed at the EV system. Such strategies include manipulation of EV formation in the endolysosomal system, EV stability in the extracellular milieu, and EV entry into target cells. Here, we provide important insights into potential mechanisms of EV transport in mammalian cells and how these may be targeted. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Seminars in Cancer Biology
volume
28
issue
Apr 23
pages
31 - 38
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:24769057
  • wos:000343019900005
  • scopus:84926254892
ISSN
1096-3650
DOI
10.1016/j.semcancer.2014.04.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c362d203-0b55-4264-8186-a6af5a18392a (old id 4429415)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24769057?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-05-02 23:25:48
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:06:12
@article{c362d203-0b55-4264-8186-a6af5a18392a,
  abstract     = {Extracellular vesicles (EVs), e.g. exosomes and microvesicles, emerge as new signaling organelles in the exchange of information between cells at the paracrine and systemic level. It is clear that these virus like particles carry complex biological information that can elicit a pleiotropic response in recipient cells with potential relevance in physiology as well as in cancer and other pathological conditions. Numerous studies convincingly show that the molecular composition of EVs closely reflects their cell or tissue of origin. Thus, the signaling status of donor cells, more specifically their endosomal compartments, may largely determine the biological output in recipient cells, a process that we then may conceptualize as vesicle mediated phene transfer. Whereas more conventional modes of cell-cell communication mostly depend on extracellular ligand concentration and cell-surface receptor availability, the magnitude of the EV signaling response relies on the capture and uptake by target cells, allowing release of the EV content. Numerous reports point at the intriguing possibility that, among thousands of mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins, single EV constituents effectuate the biological response, e.g. stimulation of angiogenesis and cancer cell metastasis, in recipient cells; however, we find it conceivable that strategies targeted at general mechanisms of EV function should provide more rational avenues for therapeutic intervention directed at the EV system. Such strategies include manipulation of EV formation in the endolysosomal system, EV stability in the extracellular milieu, and EV entry into target cells. Here, we provide important insights into potential mechanisms of EV transport in mammalian cells and how these may be targeted.},
  author       = {Christianson, Helena and Svensson, Katrin and Belting, Mattias},
  issn         = {1096-3650},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Apr 23},
  pages        = {31--38},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Seminars in Cancer Biology},
  title        = {Exosome and microvesicle mediated phene transfer in mammalian cells.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2014.04.007},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2014},
}