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Biological effects of a disposable, canisterless negative pressure wound therapy system.

Malmsjö, Malin LU ; Huddleston, Elizabeth and Martin, Robin (2014) In Eplasty: Open Access Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 14(Apr 2). p.15-15
Abstract
Objective: Recent developments of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) systems have focused on making pumps smaller, lighter, and more portable. The recently introduced PICO system manages wound fluid through a highly breathable film within the dressing, thereby negating the need for a canister, which allows greater mobility and patient concordance. The aim of this study is to compare the biological effects of this system compared to a traditional NPWT system. Methods: Laboratory tests were carried out to demonstrate the fluid handling properties of the PICO™ system. Porcine full thickness defect wounds and sutured incisional wounds were used to compare the biological effects. Wounds were treated with PICO dressings or traditional NPWT... (More)
Objective: Recent developments of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) systems have focused on making pumps smaller, lighter, and more portable. The recently introduced PICO system manages wound fluid through a highly breathable film within the dressing, thereby negating the need for a canister, which allows greater mobility and patient concordance. The aim of this study is to compare the biological effects of this system compared to a traditional NPWT system. Methods: Laboratory tests were carried out to demonstrate the fluid handling properties of the PICO™ system. Porcine full thickness defect wounds and sutured incisional wounds were used to compare the biological effects. Wounds were treated with PICO dressings or traditional NPWT dressings and connected to either a PICO device or a traditional NPWT device. Results: The PICO dressing manages exudate predominantly through evaporative loss (up to 85% of all fluid entering the dressing). Both traditional NPWT and the PICO system maintained therapeutic levels of negative pressure in all wounds. Both NPWT systems produced similar effects on wound edge contraction and microvascular blood flow in defect wounds. No significant changes in blood flow or wound contraction were noted in incision wounds for any NPWT combinations tested. Conclusions: The disposable, canisterless PICO NPWT system functions in the same manner as the traditional NPWT systems with regard to fluid handling, pressure transmission to the wound bed, tissue contraction, and changes in blood flow. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Eplasty: Open Access Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
volume
14
issue
Apr 2
pages
15 - 15
publisher
Open Science
external identifiers
  • PMID:24741386
ISSN
1937-5719
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
44172926-b516-4a1b-a888-be2e8791dbd9 (old id 4429937)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24741386?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-05-05 17:49:04
date last changed
2016-04-16 06:17:24
@article{44172926-b516-4a1b-a888-be2e8791dbd9,
  abstract     = {Objective: Recent developments of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) systems have focused on making pumps smaller, lighter, and more portable. The recently introduced PICO system manages wound fluid through a highly breathable film within the dressing, thereby negating the need for a canister, which allows greater mobility and patient concordance. The aim of this study is to compare the biological effects of this system compared to a traditional NPWT system. Methods: Laboratory tests were carried out to demonstrate the fluid handling properties of the PICO™ system. Porcine full thickness defect wounds and sutured incisional wounds were used to compare the biological effects. Wounds were treated with PICO dressings or traditional NPWT dressings and connected to either a PICO device or a traditional NPWT device. Results: The PICO dressing manages exudate predominantly through evaporative loss (up to 85% of all fluid entering the dressing). Both traditional NPWT and the PICO system maintained therapeutic levels of negative pressure in all wounds. Both NPWT systems produced similar effects on wound edge contraction and microvascular blood flow in defect wounds. No significant changes in blood flow or wound contraction were noted in incision wounds for any NPWT combinations tested. Conclusions: The disposable, canisterless PICO NPWT system functions in the same manner as the traditional NPWT systems with regard to fluid handling, pressure transmission to the wound bed, tissue contraction, and changes in blood flow.},
  author       = {Malmsjö, Malin and Huddleston, Elizabeth and Martin, Robin},
  issn         = {1937-5719},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Apr 2},
  pages        = {15--15},
  publisher    = {Open Science},
  series       = {Eplasty: Open Access Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery},
  title        = {Biological effects of a disposable, canisterless negative pressure wound therapy system.},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}