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Small Distal Muscles and Balance Predict Survival in End-Stage Renal Disease.

Hellberg, Matthias LU ; Wiberg, Eva Maria; Simonsen, Ole LU ; Höglund, Peter LU and Clyne, Naomi LU (2014) In Nephron Clinical Practice 126(3). p.116-123
Abstract
Background/Aims: Survival for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) has been shown to correlate to the level of physical activity and exercise capacity. We examined whether composite measures of functional status at the start of RRT predict survival. Methods: In this retrospective study, the same physiotherapist, using a standardized battery of tests for functional status, tested 134 patients at the start of RRT. Results: At the end of the observation period, 112 patients (84%) were still alive. Age (p < 0.0001), co-morbidity (p = 0.028), hand grip strength (right: p = 0.0065; left: p = 0.0039), standing heel rise (right: p = 0.011; left: p = 0.004) and functional reach (p = 0.015) were significant predictors of survival. After... (More)
Background/Aims: Survival for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) has been shown to correlate to the level of physical activity and exercise capacity. We examined whether composite measures of functional status at the start of RRT predict survival. Methods: In this retrospective study, the same physiotherapist, using a standardized battery of tests for functional status, tested 134 patients at the start of RRT. Results: At the end of the observation period, 112 patients (84%) were still alive. Age (p < 0.0001), co-morbidity (p = 0.028), hand grip strength (right: p = 0.0065; left: p = 0.0039), standing heel rise (right: p = 0.011; left: p = 0.004) and functional reach (p = 0.015) were significant predictors of survival. After adjustment for sex, age and co-morbidity, hand grip strength left (p = 0.023) was a significant predictor of survival. Conclusion: Hand grip strength, standing heel rise and functional reach at the start of RRT seem to affect survival. A 50% reduction in hand grip strength left was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in mortality. Deterioration of function in small distal muscles and balance may be early signs of uraemic myopathy. A relatively simple and clinically feasible battery of tests can help detect patients at risk. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nephron Clinical Practice
volume
126
issue
3
pages
116 - 123
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:24713811
  • wos:000338363900003
  • scopus:84897358028
ISSN
1660-2110
DOI
10.1159/000358431
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
975257cb-3196-468c-9b10-a458e90408c8 (old id 4430601)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24713811?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-05-06 19:07:32
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:16:26
@article{975257cb-3196-468c-9b10-a458e90408c8,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Survival for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) has been shown to correlate to the level of physical activity and exercise capacity. We examined whether composite measures of functional status at the start of RRT predict survival. Methods: In this retrospective study, the same physiotherapist, using a standardized battery of tests for functional status, tested 134 patients at the start of RRT. Results: At the end of the observation period, 112 patients (84%) were still alive. Age (p &lt; 0.0001), co-morbidity (p = 0.028), hand grip strength (right: p = 0.0065; left: p = 0.0039), standing heel rise (right: p = 0.011; left: p = 0.004) and functional reach (p = 0.015) were significant predictors of survival. After adjustment for sex, age and co-morbidity, hand grip strength left (p = 0.023) was a significant predictor of survival. Conclusion: Hand grip strength, standing heel rise and functional reach at the start of RRT seem to affect survival. A 50% reduction in hand grip strength left was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in mortality. Deterioration of function in small distal muscles and balance may be early signs of uraemic myopathy. A relatively simple and clinically feasible battery of tests can help detect patients at risk. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
  author       = {Hellberg, Matthias and Wiberg, Eva Maria and Simonsen, Ole and Höglund, Peter and Clyne, Naomi},
  issn         = {1660-2110},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {116--123},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Nephron Clinical Practice},
  title        = {Small Distal Muscles and Balance Predict Survival in End-Stage Renal Disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000358431},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2014},
}