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Telomerase activity analyzed with trap in situ provides additional information in effusions remaining equivocal after immunocytochemistry and hyaluronan analysis.

Adell, Elisabet and Dejmek, Annika LU (2014) In Diagnostic Cytopathology 42(12). p.1051-1057
Abstract
Cytology is central in the diagnosis of malignancy in effusions. Ancillary techniques, mainly immunocytochemistry, have considerably improved the sensitivity but some 10% of all cases remain equivocal and require the addition of new diagnostic modalities. We have previously shown that strong nuclear telomerase activity determined with Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) in situ is specific for malignant cells and could be a candidate for an additional test. Thirty effusions remaining diagnostically equivocal after the use of immunocytochemistry and the determination of the hyaluronan content were reviewed and their TRAP in situ reactivity was related to the definitive diagnoses based on all available data. There were seven... (More)
Cytology is central in the diagnosis of malignancy in effusions. Ancillary techniques, mainly immunocytochemistry, have considerably improved the sensitivity but some 10% of all cases remain equivocal and require the addition of new diagnostic modalities. We have previously shown that strong nuclear telomerase activity determined with Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) in situ is specific for malignant cells and could be a candidate for an additional test. Thirty effusions remaining diagnostically equivocal after the use of immunocytochemistry and the determination of the hyaluronan content were reviewed and their TRAP in situ reactivity was related to the definitive diagnoses based on all available data. There were seven effusions from patients with definitive benign diagnoses and 23 effusions from patients with definitive malignant diagnoses. Strong telomerase activity was seen only in effusions from patients with definitive malignant diagnosis, all effusions from patients with benign disease lacking strong telomerase activity, whereas eight of the malignant cases, including three cases of epithelial mesothelioma, showed strong reactivity. Strong nuclear TRAP in situ reactivity was demonstrated only in effusions from patients with verified malignant disease. Although the study is small, it suggests that TRAP in situ activity provides diagnostic information in about one-third of effusions remaining cytologically equivocal after the use of current ancillary techniques. The most striking diagnostic improvement appears to be gained in epithelial mesotheliomas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diagnostic Cytopathology
volume
42
issue
12
pages
1051 - 1057
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:24692425
  • wos:000345210700006
  • scopus:84911375764
ISSN
8755-1039
DOI
10.1002/dc.23165
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d051cf9f-e0d3-4b35-9da4-448f611ff9bb (old id 4431289)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24692425?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-05-06 21:59:20
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:02:58
@article{d051cf9f-e0d3-4b35-9da4-448f611ff9bb,
  abstract     = {Cytology is central in the diagnosis of malignancy in effusions. Ancillary techniques, mainly immunocytochemistry, have considerably improved the sensitivity but some 10% of all cases remain equivocal and require the addition of new diagnostic modalities. We have previously shown that strong nuclear telomerase activity determined with Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) in situ is specific for malignant cells and could be a candidate for an additional test. Thirty effusions remaining diagnostically equivocal after the use of immunocytochemistry and the determination of the hyaluronan content were reviewed and their TRAP in situ reactivity was related to the definitive diagnoses based on all available data. There were seven effusions from patients with definitive benign diagnoses and 23 effusions from patients with definitive malignant diagnoses. Strong telomerase activity was seen only in effusions from patients with definitive malignant diagnosis, all effusions from patients with benign disease lacking strong telomerase activity, whereas eight of the malignant cases, including three cases of epithelial mesothelioma, showed strong reactivity. Strong nuclear TRAP in situ reactivity was demonstrated only in effusions from patients with verified malignant disease. Although the study is small, it suggests that TRAP in situ activity provides diagnostic information in about one-third of effusions remaining cytologically equivocal after the use of current ancillary techniques. The most striking diagnostic improvement appears to be gained in epithelial mesotheliomas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Adell, Elisabet and Dejmek, Annika},
  issn         = {8755-1039},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1051--1057},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Diagnostic Cytopathology},
  title        = {Telomerase activity analyzed with trap in situ provides additional information in effusions remaining equivocal after immunocytochemistry and hyaluronan analysis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dc.23165},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2014},
}