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Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathways are conserved between moths and the butterfly Bicyclus anynana

Liénard, Marjorie LU orcid ; Wang, Hong-Lei LU ; Lassance, Jean-Marc LU and Löfstedt, Christer LU (2014) In Nature Communications 5. p.1-12
Abstract
Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl... (More)
Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl Δ11-desaturase and two specialized alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases. Our study provides the first evidence of conservation and sharing of ancestral genetic modules for the production of FA-derived pheromones over a long evolutionary timeframe thereby reconciling mate communication in moths and butterflies. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature Communications
volume
5
article number
3957
pages
12 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:24862548
  • wos:000337539700002
  • scopus:84901484468
  • pmid:24862548
ISSN
2041-1723
DOI
10.1038/ncomms4957
project
Evolutionary mechanisms of pheromone divergence in Lepidoptera
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8d901ed8-5696-4b16-959a-d970a31a9904 (old id 4452559)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 13:04:21
date last changed
2021-09-15 03:44:04
@article{8d901ed8-5696-4b16-959a-d970a31a9904,
  abstract     = {Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly <i>Bicyclus anynana</i>, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl Δ11-desaturase and two specialized alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases. Our study provides the first evidence of conservation and sharing of ancestral genetic modules for the production of FA-derived pheromones over a long evolutionary timeframe thereby reconciling mate communication in moths and butterflies.},
  author       = {Liénard, Marjorie and Wang, Hong-Lei and Lassance, Jean-Marc and Löfstedt, Christer},
  issn         = {2041-1723},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--12},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Communications},
  title        = {Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathways are conserved between moths and the butterfly <i>Bicyclus anynana</i>},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms4957},
  doi          = {10.1038/ncomms4957},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2014},
}