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Progression of Early Retinal Dysfunction in Diabetes Over Time: Results of a Long-term Prospective Clinical Study.

Hellgren, Karl-Johan LU ; Agardh, Elisabet LU and Bengtsson, Boel LU (2014) In Diabetes 63(9). p.3104-3111
Abstract
We explored signs of retinal dysfunction over time in diabetic subjects before or early in the course of retinopathy. Patients with no, mild, or moderate retinopathy were consecutively recruited and underwent standard automated perimetry, visual acuity measurement, and fundus photography. These examinations and measurements of HbA1c and blood pressure were repeated for up to 5 years from baseline. Visual field improvement/deterioration in diabetic subjects was evaluated using significance limits for change. Progression or regression of retinopathy was defined as a two-step change on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study final severity scale. Seventy-four subjects completed at least 3 years of follow-up, and 22% showed visual field... (More)
We explored signs of retinal dysfunction over time in diabetic subjects before or early in the course of retinopathy. Patients with no, mild, or moderate retinopathy were consecutively recruited and underwent standard automated perimetry, visual acuity measurement, and fundus photography. These examinations and measurements of HbA1c and blood pressure were repeated for up to 5 years from baseline. Visual field improvement/deterioration in diabetic subjects was evaluated using significance limits for change. Progression or regression of retinopathy was defined as a two-step change on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study final severity scale. Seventy-four subjects completed at least 3 years of follow-up, and 22% showed visual field worsening, defined as repeated significant deterioration at ≥10% of the test points, whereas only 1% showed field improvement. Worsening occurred in subjects both with and without vascular lesions. The degree of retinopathy was stable throughout the observation period in 68 of 74 eyes, improved in 4, and worsened in 2. Visual field deterioration was not correlated with a change in retinopathy. By using perimetry with an analysis tailored for monitoring diabetic subjects, we were able to demonstrate progression of retinal dysfunction over time, which may represent early signs of retinal neurodegeneration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes
volume
63
issue
9
pages
3104 - 3111
publisher
American Diabetes Association Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:24848062
  • wos:000341505300027
  • scopus:84906707193
ISSN
1939-327X
DOI
10.2337/db13-1628
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52610ed7-c13b-4043-b6cd-f4715b907faf (old id 4453986)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24848062?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-06-04 22:42:39
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:20:56
@article{52610ed7-c13b-4043-b6cd-f4715b907faf,
  abstract     = {We explored signs of retinal dysfunction over time in diabetic subjects before or early in the course of retinopathy. Patients with no, mild, or moderate retinopathy were consecutively recruited and underwent standard automated perimetry, visual acuity measurement, and fundus photography. These examinations and measurements of HbA1c and blood pressure were repeated for up to 5 years from baseline. Visual field improvement/deterioration in diabetic subjects was evaluated using significance limits for change. Progression or regression of retinopathy was defined as a two-step change on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study final severity scale. Seventy-four subjects completed at least 3 years of follow-up, and 22% showed visual field worsening, defined as repeated significant deterioration at ≥10% of the test points, whereas only 1% showed field improvement. Worsening occurred in subjects both with and without vascular lesions. The degree of retinopathy was stable throughout the observation period in 68 of 74 eyes, improved in 4, and worsened in 2. Visual field deterioration was not correlated with a change in retinopathy. By using perimetry with an analysis tailored for monitoring diabetic subjects, we were able to demonstrate progression of retinal dysfunction over time, which may represent early signs of retinal neurodegeneration.},
  author       = {Hellgren, Karl-Johan and Agardh, Elisabet and Bengtsson, Boel},
  issn         = {1939-327X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {3104--3111},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association Inc.},
  series       = {Diabetes},
  title        = {Progression of Early Retinal Dysfunction in Diabetes Over Time: Results of a Long-term Prospective Clinical Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db13-1628},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2014},
}