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Occupational performance and factors associated with outcomes in patients participating in a musculoskeletal pain rehabilitation programme.

Persson, Elisabeth LU ; Lexell, Jan LU ; Rivano, Marcelo LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2014) In Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 46(6). p.546-552
Abstract
Objectives: To assess outcomes after a pain rehabilitation programme in terms of occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance, and to investigate whether socio-demographic factors and pain-related factors were associated with outcomes at follow-up. Methods: A pre- and post-test study of 555 participants with musculoskeletal pain who completed a pain rehabilitation programme. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used as the primary outcome measure. Socio-demographic and pain-related factors were collected using background questionnaires, the Disability Rating Index (DRI) and the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results:... (More)
Objectives: To assess outcomes after a pain rehabilitation programme in terms of occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance, and to investigate whether socio-demographic factors and pain-related factors were associated with outcomes at follow-up. Methods: A pre- and post-test study of 555 participants with musculoskeletal pain who completed a pain rehabilitation programme. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used as the primary outcome measure. Socio-demographic and pain-related factors were collected using background questionnaires, the Disability Rating Index (DRI) and the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Statistically significant improvements were seen on occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance at the 1-year follow-up. Female gender, less severe disability, less life interference and more life control predicted improvements 1 year after the programme. High initial scores on occupational performance and satisfaction with performance predicted reduced possibilities for improvements in these respects. Conclusion: A pain rehabilitation programme can, for a majority of participants, affect occupational performance and satisfaction with performance. Men and those with more severe pain-related consequences may need additional or modified rehabilitation interventions in order to improve their occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
46
issue
6
pages
546 - 552
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:24819126
  • wos:000338393300009
  • scopus:84910108077
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.2340/16501977-1810
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b3a53c8e-9435-4731-9a83-81eb010de728 (old id 4455357)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24819126?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-06-03 23:35:26
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:21:10
@article{b3a53c8e-9435-4731-9a83-81eb010de728,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To assess outcomes after a pain rehabilitation programme in terms of occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance, and to investigate whether socio-demographic factors and pain-related factors were associated with outcomes at follow-up. Methods: A pre- and post-test study of 555 participants with musculoskeletal pain who completed a pain rehabilitation programme. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used as the primary outcome measure. Socio-demographic and pain-related factors were collected using background questionnaires, the Disability Rating Index (DRI) and the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). Data were analysed using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Statistically significant improvements were seen on occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance at the 1-year follow-up. Female gender, less severe disability, less life interference and more life control predicted improvements 1 year after the programme. High initial scores on occupational performance and satisfaction with performance predicted reduced possibilities for improvements in these respects. Conclusion: A pain rehabilitation programme can, for a majority of participants, affect occupational performance and satisfaction with performance. Men and those with more severe pain-related consequences may need additional or modified rehabilitation interventions in order to improve their occupational performance and satisfaction with occupational performance.},
  author       = {Persson, Elisabeth and Lexell, Jan and Rivano, Marcelo and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {546--552},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Occupational performance and factors associated with outcomes in patients participating in a musculoskeletal pain rehabilitation programme.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-1810},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2014},
}