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Hypersensitivity and the working environment for allergy nurses in sweden.

Kalm-Stephens, Pia; Sterner, Therese LU ; Diab, Kerstin LU and Smedje, Greta (2014) In Journal of Allergy 2014(Apr 6).
Abstract
Background. Allergy nurses are exposed to allergens and respiratory irritants, and there are no national guidelines addressing personnel safety when working with these agents. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of allergies, asthma, and hypersensitivity symptoms among allergy nurses and the use of protective equipment and measures when working with allergen concentrates and respiratory irritants. Methods. A questionnaire survey was performed among the members of the Swedish Association of Allergy Nurses. Results. Diagnosed asthma was reported by 17%, while 18% had allergy to pets, 28% had allergy to pollens, and 26% reported nasal symptoms. Fifty-one percent reported a history of asthma, allergic diseases, or hypersensitivity... (More)
Background. Allergy nurses are exposed to allergens and respiratory irritants, and there are no national guidelines addressing personnel safety when working with these agents. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of allergies, asthma, and hypersensitivity symptoms among allergy nurses and the use of protective equipment and measures when working with allergen concentrates and respiratory irritants. Methods. A questionnaire survey was performed among the members of the Swedish Association of Allergy Nurses. Results. Diagnosed asthma was reported by 17%, while 18% had allergy to pets, 28% had allergy to pollens, and 26% reported nasal symptoms. Fifty-one percent reported a history of asthma, allergic diseases, or hypersensitivity symptoms in their family. Exhaust ventilation was used by 24% during skin prick tests, 17% during allergen specific immunotherapy, and 33% when performing methacholine challenge tests. Tightly closed containers for disposable waste were used by 58% during skin prick tests, by 60% during immunotherapy, and by 40% during Pc provocation tests. Conclusion. Allergy nurses had a tendency to increased prevalence of lower respiratory symptoms, asthma, and allergic rhinitis and more than half of the nurses had a family history of asthma, allergic diseases, or hypersensitivity symptoms. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the validity of these results. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Allergy
volume
2014
issue
Apr 6
publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
external identifiers
  • pmid:24803940
ISSN
1687-9783
DOI
10.1155/2014/681934
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fec66374-9b62-4c6c-bbe8-f7fd9e6e76fe (old id 4455717)
alternative location
http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/4455717/file/5042650.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24803940?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-06-03 21:10:34
date last changed
2016-09-20 03:37:07
@article{fec66374-9b62-4c6c-bbe8-f7fd9e6e76fe,
  abstract     = {Background. Allergy nurses are exposed to allergens and respiratory irritants, and there are no national guidelines addressing personnel safety when working with these agents. Objective. To investigate the prevalence of allergies, asthma, and hypersensitivity symptoms among allergy nurses and the use of protective equipment and measures when working with allergen concentrates and respiratory irritants. Methods. A questionnaire survey was performed among the members of the Swedish Association of Allergy Nurses. Results. Diagnosed asthma was reported by 17%, while 18% had allergy to pets, 28% had allergy to pollens, and 26% reported nasal symptoms. Fifty-one percent reported a history of asthma, allergic diseases, or hypersensitivity symptoms in their family. Exhaust ventilation was used by 24% during skin prick tests, 17% during allergen specific immunotherapy, and 33% when performing methacholine challenge tests. Tightly closed containers for disposable waste were used by 58% during skin prick tests, by 60% during immunotherapy, and by 40% during Pc provocation tests. Conclusion. Allergy nurses had a tendency to increased prevalence of lower respiratory symptoms, asthma, and allergic rhinitis and more than half of the nurses had a family history of asthma, allergic diseases, or hypersensitivity symptoms. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the validity of these results.},
  articleno    = {681934},
  author       = {Kalm-Stephens, Pia and Sterner, Therese and Diab, Kerstin and Smedje, Greta},
  issn         = {1687-9783},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Apr 6},
  publisher    = {Hindawi Publishing Corporation},
  series       = {Journal of Allergy},
  title        = {Hypersensitivity and the working environment for allergy nurses in sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/681934},
  volume       = {2014},
  year         = {2014},
}