Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Dying Fit or Not—Physical Activity as Antidote to Death?

Boelsbjerg, Hanne Bess and Glasdam, Stinne LU (2022) In Omega: the International Journal of Management Science 84(3). p.771-791
Abstract
Physical activity has increasingly gained attention within palliative care. This article aims to explore how the idea of physical activity influences patients with advanced cancer and health-care professionals’ interactions. The empirical material was gathered as part of an anthropological field study about palliative care needs among 16 patients with advanced cancer, consisting of observations and interviews with patients, relatives, and professionals. Two of the patient cases were analyzed, inspired by Goffman’s theory, showing how patients and health-care professionals interact in relation to physical activity. The findings show that patients played roles either embracing physical activity or distancing it by postponement. Professionals... (More)
Physical activity has increasingly gained attention within palliative care. This article aims to explore how the idea of physical activity influences patients with advanced cancer and health-care professionals’ interactions. The empirical material was gathered as part of an anthropological field study about palliative care needs among 16 patients with advanced cancer, consisting of observations and interviews with patients, relatives, and professionals. Two of the patient cases were analyzed, inspired by Goffman’s theory, showing how patients and health-care professionals interact in relation to physical activity. The findings show that patients played roles either embracing physical activity or distancing it by postponement. Professionals played expert roles of duty and attachment, stressing the importance of physical activity. Thus, they accepted a minimum of physical activity when patients were close to death. Professionals regarded patients’ absence of physical activity as a lack of desire to live; patients regard it as a way to live. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Physical activity has increasingly gained attention within palliative care. This article aims to explore how the idea of physical activity influences patients with advanced cancer and health-care professionals’ interactions. The empirical material was gathered as part of an anthropological field study about palliative care needs among 16 patients with advanced cancer, consisting of observations and interviews with patients, relatives, and professionals. Two of the patient cases were analyzed, inspired by Goffman’s theory, showing how patients and health-care professionals interact in relation to physical activity. The findings show that patients played roles either embracing physical activity or distancing it by postponement. Professionals... (More)
Physical activity has increasingly gained attention within palliative care. This article aims to explore how the idea of physical activity influences patients with advanced cancer and health-care professionals’ interactions. The empirical material was gathered as part of an anthropological field study about palliative care needs among 16 patients with advanced cancer, consisting of observations and interviews with patients, relatives, and professionals. Two of the patient cases were analyzed, inspired by Goffman’s theory, showing how patients and health-care professionals interact in relation to physical activity. The findings show that patients played roles either embracing physical activity or distancing it by postponement. Professionals played expert roles of duty and attachment, stressing the importance of physical activity. Thus, they accepted a minimum of physical activity when patients were close to death. Professionals regarded patients’ absence of physical activity as a lack of desire to live; patients regard it as a way to live. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Physical activity, advanced cancer patients, health-care professionals, roles, stigmatisation, Goffman, Palliative care, Etnologi, field study
in
Omega: the International Journal of Management Science
volume
84
issue
3
pages
771 - 791
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85084728914
  • pmid:32237959
ISSN
0305-0483
DOI
10.1177/0030222820913716
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
445cd32a-6b8a-4cf5-92c8-2f05b4e3d7c0
date added to LUP
2020-04-03 11:42:12
date last changed
2022-04-18 21:34:48
@article{445cd32a-6b8a-4cf5-92c8-2f05b4e3d7c0,
  abstract     = {{Physical activity has increasingly gained attention within palliative care. This article aims to explore how the idea of physical activity influences patients with advanced cancer and health-care professionals’ interactions. The empirical material was gathered as part of an anthropological field study about palliative care needs among 16 patients with advanced cancer, consisting of observations and interviews with patients, relatives, and professionals. Two of the patient cases were analyzed, inspired by Goffman’s theory, showing how patients and health-care professionals interact in relation to physical activity. The findings show that patients played roles either embracing physical activity or distancing it by postponement. Professionals played expert roles of duty and attachment, stressing the importance of physical activity. Thus, they accepted a minimum of physical activity when patients were close to death. Professionals regarded patients’ absence of physical activity as a lack of desire to live; patients regard it as a way to live.}},
  author       = {{Boelsbjerg, Hanne Bess and Glasdam, Stinne}},
  issn         = {{0305-0483}},
  keywords     = {{Physical activity; advanced cancer patients; health-care professionals; roles; stigmatisation; Goffman; Palliative care; Etnologi; field study}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{771--791}},
  publisher    = {{Elsevier}},
  series       = {{Omega: the International Journal of Management Science}},
  title        = {{Dying Fit or Not—Physical Activity as Antidote to Death?}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0030222820913716}},
  doi          = {{10.1177/0030222820913716}},
  volume       = {{84}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}