Advanced

Moss-nitrogen input to boreal forest soils: Tracking N-15 in a field experiment

Rousk, Kathrin LU ; Jones, David L. and DeLuca, Thomas H. (2014) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 72. p.100-104
Abstract
Cyanobacteria living epiphytically on mosses in pristine, unpolluted areas fix substantial amounts of atmospheric nitrogen (N) and therefore represent a primary source of N in N-limited boreal forests. However, the fate of this N is unclear, in particular, how the fixed N-2 enters the soil and becomes available to the ecosystem. In this study, we applied N-15-ammonium chloride (N-15-NH4Cl) onto carpets of the feather moss Pleurozium schreberi and traced the N-15 label into green (living) and brown (senescent) moss and into the upper soil layer over time. Further, we placed filters between moss and soil to assess the role of moss-associated fungi for N-transfer to the soil. The experiment was conducted at endpoints of a N-2 fixation... (More)
Cyanobacteria living epiphytically on mosses in pristine, unpolluted areas fix substantial amounts of atmospheric nitrogen (N) and therefore represent a primary source of N in N-limited boreal forests. However, the fate of this N is unclear, in particular, how the fixed N-2 enters the soil and becomes available to the ecosystem. In this study, we applied N-15-ammonium chloride (N-15-NH4Cl) onto carpets of the feather moss Pleurozium schreberi and traced the N-15 label into green (living) and brown (senescent) moss and into the upper soil layer over time. Further, we placed filters between moss and soil to assess the role of moss-associated fungi for N-transfer to the soil. The experiment was conducted at endpoints of a N-2 fixation gradient in Northern Sweden. Feather moss retained the applied N in the green moss parts for up to 1 year and no increase of excess N-15 was found in the brown moss parts or in the soil within that same time frame. The filter treatment did not alter the N-15-distribution in moss or soil. Nitrogen retention in the moss was similar regardless of position along the N-2 fixation gradient. Our results suggest that mosses represent a short-term inorganic N sink and that transfer of N to the soil is not facilitated by fungal hyphae. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Biological N-2 fixation, Bryophytes, Cyanobacteria, Forest ecology, N, cycle, N limitation, Stable isotopes
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
72
pages
100 - 104
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000334973700013
  • scopus:84894069902
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.01.031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a2104fd-ac81-4d34-a0bf-694b3ec321da (old id 4488398)
date added to LUP
2014-06-23 13:54:43
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:57:47
@article{4a2104fd-ac81-4d34-a0bf-694b3ec321da,
  abstract     = {Cyanobacteria living epiphytically on mosses in pristine, unpolluted areas fix substantial amounts of atmospheric nitrogen (N) and therefore represent a primary source of N in N-limited boreal forests. However, the fate of this N is unclear, in particular, how the fixed N-2 enters the soil and becomes available to the ecosystem. In this study, we applied N-15-ammonium chloride (N-15-NH4Cl) onto carpets of the feather moss Pleurozium schreberi and traced the N-15 label into green (living) and brown (senescent) moss and into the upper soil layer over time. Further, we placed filters between moss and soil to assess the role of moss-associated fungi for N-transfer to the soil. The experiment was conducted at endpoints of a N-2 fixation gradient in Northern Sweden. Feather moss retained the applied N in the green moss parts for up to 1 year and no increase of excess N-15 was found in the brown moss parts or in the soil within that same time frame. The filter treatment did not alter the N-15-distribution in moss or soil. Nitrogen retention in the moss was similar regardless of position along the N-2 fixation gradient. Our results suggest that mosses represent a short-term inorganic N sink and that transfer of N to the soil is not facilitated by fungal hyphae. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Rousk, Kathrin and Jones, David L. and DeLuca, Thomas H.},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Biological N-2 fixation,Bryophytes,Cyanobacteria,Forest ecology,N,cycle,N limitation,Stable isotopes},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {100--104},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Moss-nitrogen input to boreal forest soils: Tracking N-15 in a field experiment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.01.031},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2014},
}