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Species diversity and abundance of dinoflagellate resting cysts seven months after a bloom of Alexandrium catenella in two contrasting coastal systems of the Chilean Inland Sea

Díaz, Patricio A.; Molinet, Carlos; Seguel, Miriam; Díaz, Manuel; Labra, Gissela and Figueroa, Rosa I. LU (2018) In European Journal of Phycology 53(3). p.410-421
Abstract

In Chile, 90% of the fish farms and major natural shellfish beds are located in the region surrounding the Inland Sea, where over the last few decades harmful phytoplankton blooms have often been observed. The onset and recurrence of bloom events are often related to the resuspension and germination of resting cysts that have accumulated in the sediments. The degree of cyst settling, accumulation and germination is highly variable between areas and depends on physical and environmental factors. To learn how differences in oceanographic exposure, amount of river runoff and bathymetry affect dinoflagellate cyst deposition, we examined the diversity and abundance of dinoflagellate resting cysts from two hydrographically contrasting coastal... (More)

In Chile, 90% of the fish farms and major natural shellfish beds are located in the region surrounding the Inland Sea, where over the last few decades harmful phytoplankton blooms have often been observed. The onset and recurrence of bloom events are often related to the resuspension and germination of resting cysts that have accumulated in the sediments. The degree of cyst settling, accumulation and germination is highly variable between areas and depends on physical and environmental factors. To learn how differences in oceanographic exposure, amount of river runoff and bathymetry affect dinoflagellate cyst deposition, we examined the diversity and abundance of dinoflagellate resting cysts from two hydrographically contrasting coastal areas (oceanic Guaitecas Archipelago and estuarine Pitipalena Fjord) of the Chilean Inland Sea in September 2006, seven months after a bloom of Alexandrium catenella, a producer of paralytic shellfish toxin. Cyst species diversity consisted of 18 taxa, including A. catenella and the noxious species Protoceratium reticulatum, both of which have caused blooms in the study area. Our results revealed significant differences between the two study sites in terms of the abundance and diversity of resting cysts, suggesting that in the specific case of A. catenella, only Guaitecas stations have potential for cyst accumulation and successful growth of cells. However, there was no evidence of long-term resting cyst beds of A. catenella at either study site.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alexandrium catenella, Chilean Inland Sea, cyst beds, dinoflagellate cysts, oceanic and estuarine systems, Protoceratium reticulatum
in
European Journal of Phycology
volume
53
issue
3
pages
410 - 421
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85048768477
ISSN
0967-0262
DOI
10.1080/09670262.2018.1455111
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
44bf0751-61a9-45c4-b8e2-ec6bc6ec2509
date added to LUP
2018-07-05 11:53:23
date last changed
2019-03-19 03:57:07
@article{44bf0751-61a9-45c4-b8e2-ec6bc6ec2509,
  abstract     = {<p>In Chile, 90% of the fish farms and major natural shellfish beds are located in the region surrounding the Inland Sea, where over the last few decades harmful phytoplankton blooms have often been observed. The onset and recurrence of bloom events are often related to the resuspension and germination of resting cysts that have accumulated in the sediments. The degree of cyst settling, accumulation and germination is highly variable between areas and depends on physical and environmental factors. To learn how differences in oceanographic exposure, amount of river runoff and bathymetry affect dinoflagellate cyst deposition, we examined the diversity and abundance of dinoflagellate resting cysts from two hydrographically contrasting coastal areas (oceanic Guaitecas Archipelago and estuarine Pitipalena Fjord) of the Chilean Inland Sea in September 2006, seven months after a bloom of Alexandrium catenella, a producer of paralytic shellfish toxin. Cyst species diversity consisted of 18 taxa, including A. catenella and the noxious species Protoceratium reticulatum, both of which have caused blooms in the study area. Our results revealed significant differences between the two study sites in terms of the abundance and diversity of resting cysts, suggesting that in the specific case of A. catenella, only Guaitecas stations have potential for cyst accumulation and successful growth of cells. However, there was no evidence of long-term resting cyst beds of A. catenella at either study site.</p>},
  author       = {Díaz, Patricio A. and Molinet, Carlos and Seguel, Miriam and Díaz, Manuel and Labra, Gissela and Figueroa, Rosa I.},
  issn         = {0967-0262},
  keyword      = {Alexandrium catenella,Chilean Inland Sea,cyst beds,dinoflagellate cysts,oceanic and estuarine systems,Protoceratium reticulatum},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {410--421},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {European Journal of Phycology},
  title        = {Species diversity and abundance of dinoflagellate resting cysts seven months after a bloom of Alexandrium catenella in two contrasting coastal systems of the Chilean Inland Sea},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09670262.2018.1455111},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2018},
}