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Advanced multiresponsive comploids: from design to possible applications.

Crassous, Jerome LU ; Mihut, Adriana LU ; Dietsch, Hervé; Pravaz, Olivier; Ackermann-Hirschi, Liliane; Hirt, Ann M and Schurtenberger, Peter LU (2014) In Nanoscale 6(15). p.8726-8735
Abstract
We extend the commonly used synthesis strategies for responsive microgels to the design of novel multiresponsive and multifunctional nanoparticles that combine inorganic magnetic, metallic/catalytic and thermoresponsive organic moieties. Magnetic responsiveness is implemented through the integration of silica-coated maghemite nanoparticles into fluorescently labeled crosslinked poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) microgels. These particles are then employed as templates for the in situ reduction of catalytically active gold nanoparticles. In order to tune the reactivity of the catalyst through a thermally controlled barrier, an additional layer of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) is added in the final step. We subsequently demonstrate... (More)
We extend the commonly used synthesis strategies for responsive microgels to the design of novel multiresponsive and multifunctional nanoparticles that combine inorganic magnetic, metallic/catalytic and thermoresponsive organic moieties. Magnetic responsiveness is implemented through the integration of silica-coated maghemite nanoparticles into fluorescently labeled crosslinked poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) microgels. These particles are then employed as templates for the in situ reduction of catalytically active gold nanoparticles. In order to tune the reactivity of the catalyst through a thermally controlled barrier, an additional layer of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) is added in the final step. We subsequently demonstrate that these particles can be employed as smart catalysts. We show that the thermoresponsive nature of the outer particle shell not only provides control over the catalytic activity, but when combined with a magnetic core allows for very efficient removal of the catalytic system through temperature-controlled reversible coagulation and subsequent magnetophoresis in an applied magnetic field gradient. We finally discuss the use of this design principle for the synthesis of complex hybrid particles for various applications that would all profit from their multiresponsive and multifunctional nature. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nanoscale
volume
6
issue
15
pages
8726 - 8735
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • pmid:24949912
  • wos:000339861500042
  • scopus:84904369692
ISSN
2040-3372
DOI
10.1039/c4nr01243g
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7745c43f-829d-4ae5-8bf2-dea0b918e73d (old id 4527455)
date added to LUP
2014-08-08 14:57:20
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:04:56
@article{7745c43f-829d-4ae5-8bf2-dea0b918e73d,
  abstract     = {We extend the commonly used synthesis strategies for responsive microgels to the design of novel multiresponsive and multifunctional nanoparticles that combine inorganic magnetic, metallic/catalytic and thermoresponsive organic moieties. Magnetic responsiveness is implemented through the integration of silica-coated maghemite nanoparticles into fluorescently labeled crosslinked poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) microgels. These particles are then employed as templates for the in situ reduction of catalytically active gold nanoparticles. In order to tune the reactivity of the catalyst through a thermally controlled barrier, an additional layer of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) is added in the final step. We subsequently demonstrate that these particles can be employed as smart catalysts. We show that the thermoresponsive nature of the outer particle shell not only provides control over the catalytic activity, but when combined with a magnetic core allows for very efficient removal of the catalytic system through temperature-controlled reversible coagulation and subsequent magnetophoresis in an applied magnetic field gradient. We finally discuss the use of this design principle for the synthesis of complex hybrid particles for various applications that would all profit from their multiresponsive and multifunctional nature.},
  author       = {Crassous, Jerome and Mihut, Adriana and Dietsch, Hervé and Pravaz, Olivier and Ackermann-Hirschi, Liliane and Hirt, Ann M and Schurtenberger, Peter},
  issn         = {2040-3372},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {15},
  pages        = {8726--8735},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Nanoscale},
  title        = {Advanced multiresponsive comploids: from design to possible applications.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4nr01243g},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2014},
}