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Leisure repertoire among persons with a spinal cord injury: Interests, performance, and well-being

Lundstrom, Ulrica; Lilja, Margareta; Petersson, Ingela; Lexell, Jan LU and Isaksson, Gunilla (2014) In Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine 37(2). p.186-192
Abstract
Objective: To explore and describe the leisure repertoire of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and how the repertoire is related to interest, performance, and well-being. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A total of 97 persons with traumatic SCI were recruited from the non-profit national organization, RG Active Rehabilitation in Sweden. Outcome measure: Data were collected through a two-part postal survey. The first comprised of questions investigating socio-demographic variables and injury characteristics; the second part included an interest checklist with 20 areas of leisure activities. Results: The participants were mostly interested in, performed, and experienced well-being from social and culture activities and... (More)
Objective: To explore and describe the leisure repertoire of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and how the repertoire is related to interest, performance, and well-being. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A total of 97 persons with traumatic SCI were recruited from the non-profit national organization, RG Active Rehabilitation in Sweden. Outcome measure: Data were collected through a two-part postal survey. The first comprised of questions investigating socio-demographic variables and injury characteristics; the second part included an interest checklist with 20 areas of leisure activities. Results: The participants were mostly interested in, performed, and experienced well-being from social and culture activities and TV/DVD/movies. The areas of leisure activities in which they had most likely experienced changes after the SCI were outdoor activities, exercise, and gardening. Sex, age, and to some extent, time since injury were related to interest, performance, well-being, and changed performance. Conclusions: The results provided an explanation and limited description of a changed leisure repertoire among persons after a traumatic SCI. The study showed that sex, age, and time since injury were more closely related to the choice of leisure activities to include in the leisure repertoire than the level of injury. This knowledge can be of importance when professionals in the field of rehabilitation are planning and implementing interventions concerning leisure activities for persons with SCI. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Leisure activities, Rehabilitation, Spinal cord injuries, Well-being, Disability, Quality of life
in
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
volume
37
issue
2
pages
186 - 192
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000337132700009
  • scopus:84895541573
ISSN
2045-7723
DOI
10.1179/2045772313Y.0000000103
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ffaa7ff5-67f1-4988-aff4-241c25ba24ef (old id 4548038)
date added to LUP
2014-08-01 07:37:09
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:19:50
@article{ffaa7ff5-67f1-4988-aff4-241c25ba24ef,
  abstract     = {Objective: To explore and describe the leisure repertoire of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and how the repertoire is related to interest, performance, and well-being. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A total of 97 persons with traumatic SCI were recruited from the non-profit national organization, RG Active Rehabilitation in Sweden. Outcome measure: Data were collected through a two-part postal survey. The first comprised of questions investigating socio-demographic variables and injury characteristics; the second part included an interest checklist with 20 areas of leisure activities. Results: The participants were mostly interested in, performed, and experienced well-being from social and culture activities and TV/DVD/movies. The areas of leisure activities in which they had most likely experienced changes after the SCI were outdoor activities, exercise, and gardening. Sex, age, and to some extent, time since injury were related to interest, performance, well-being, and changed performance. Conclusions: The results provided an explanation and limited description of a changed leisure repertoire among persons after a traumatic SCI. The study showed that sex, age, and time since injury were more closely related to the choice of leisure activities to include in the leisure repertoire than the level of injury. This knowledge can be of importance when professionals in the field of rehabilitation are planning and implementing interventions concerning leisure activities for persons with SCI.},
  author       = {Lundstrom, Ulrica and Lilja, Margareta and Petersson, Ingela and Lexell, Jan and Isaksson, Gunilla},
  issn         = {2045-7723},
  keyword      = {Leisure activities,Rehabilitation,Spinal cord injuries,Well-being,Disability,Quality of life},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {186--192},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine},
  title        = {Leisure repertoire among persons with a spinal cord injury: Interests, performance, and well-being},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/2045772313Y.0000000103},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2014},
}