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An organizational- level occupational health intervention: Employee perceptions of exposure to changes, and psychosocial outcomes

Hasson, Henna LU ; Brisson, Chantal; Guerin, Stephanie; Gilbert-Ouimet, Mahee; Baril-Gingras, Genevieve; Vezina, Michel and Bourbonnais, Renee (2014) In Work & Stress 28(2). p.179-197
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of their exposure to an organizational-level occupational health intervention and its psychosocial outcomes. Participants were employees of an insurance firm (N = 1084) in Quebec, Canada. The intervention was designed to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support and low rewards). Departmental managers were responsible for implementing changes to reduce exposure to these factors. Employees' perceptions of exposure to the intervention and its impact on their work were measured in 2007 through questionnaires. Psychological demands, decision latitude, social support and rewards measured in 2005... (More)
This study aimed to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of their exposure to an organizational-level occupational health intervention and its psychosocial outcomes. Participants were employees of an insurance firm (N = 1084) in Quebec, Canada. The intervention was designed to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support and low rewards). Departmental managers were responsible for implementing changes to reduce exposure to these factors. Employees' perceptions of exposure to the intervention and its impact on their work were measured in 2007 through questionnaires. Psychological demands, decision latitude, social support and rewards measured in 2005 and 2007 were used to assess outcomes. Employees who perceived that they had been exposed to the intervention changes showed more improvement in outcomes than those who did not perceive changes. The greatest differences in outcomes were found in those participants who perceived that workplace changes had improved their work situation as compared to those who perceived the changes as neutral or negative. The results suggest that measurement of employee-perceived impact of each intervention change on their work situation may be even more important than actual exposure, and should be included in the measurement of exposure to organization-level interventions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
intervention, process, perception, work-related stress, psychosocial, work environment, job demand-control-support model, effort-reward, imbalance model
in
Work & Stress
volume
28
issue
2
pages
179 - 197
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000335117800005
  • scopus:84899906411
ISSN
1464-5335
DOI
10.1080/02678373.2014.907370
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae28d66b-9c96-4f9b-a97b-d4f2f71ae1f7 (old id 4559272)
date added to LUP
2014-08-01 07:43:13
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:25:42
@article{ae28d66b-9c96-4f9b-a97b-d4f2f71ae1f7,
  abstract     = {This study aimed to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of their exposure to an organizational-level occupational health intervention and its psychosocial outcomes. Participants were employees of an insurance firm (N = 1084) in Quebec, Canada. The intervention was designed to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support and low rewards). Departmental managers were responsible for implementing changes to reduce exposure to these factors. Employees' perceptions of exposure to the intervention and its impact on their work were measured in 2007 through questionnaires. Psychological demands, decision latitude, social support and rewards measured in 2005 and 2007 were used to assess outcomes. Employees who perceived that they had been exposed to the intervention changes showed more improvement in outcomes than those who did not perceive changes. The greatest differences in outcomes were found in those participants who perceived that workplace changes had improved their work situation as compared to those who perceived the changes as neutral or negative. The results suggest that measurement of employee-perceived impact of each intervention change on their work situation may be even more important than actual exposure, and should be included in the measurement of exposure to organization-level interventions.},
  author       = {Hasson, Henna and Brisson, Chantal and Guerin, Stephanie and Gilbert-Ouimet, Mahee and Baril-Gingras, Genevieve and Vezina, Michel and Bourbonnais, Renee},
  issn         = {1464-5335},
  keyword      = {intervention,process,perception,work-related stress,psychosocial,work environment,job demand-control-support model,effort-reward,imbalance model},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {179--197},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Work & Stress},
  title        = {An organizational- level occupational health intervention: Employee perceptions of exposure to changes, and psychosocial outcomes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02678373.2014.907370},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2014},
}