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Medication beliefs and self-reported adherence-results of a pharmacist's consultation: a pilot study

Ostbring, Malin Johansson; Eriksson, Tommy LU ; Petersson, Goran and Hellstrom, Lina (2014) In European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy: Science and Practice 21(2). p.102-107
Abstract
Objectives Clinical outcomes in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease depend on the patients' adherence to prescribed medicines. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centred approach used to change different health behaviours. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a clinical pharmacist's consultation on beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods CHD-patients participating in a prevention programme at the Kalmar County Hospital were randomised to control or intervention. The intervention consisted of a medication review focused on cardiovascular drugs, and a semistructured interview based on MI-approach, with a... (More)
Objectives Clinical outcomes in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease depend on the patients' adherence to prescribed medicines. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centred approach used to change different health behaviours. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a clinical pharmacist's consultation on beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods CHD-patients participating in a prevention programme at the Kalmar County Hospital were randomised to control or intervention. The intervention consisted of a medication review focused on cardiovascular drugs, and a semistructured interview based on MI-approach, with a follow-up phone call 2 weeks later. The intervention was conducted by a clinical pharmacist at the cardiology unit 3 months postdischarge. Primary outcome measures were the results from the Beliefs about Medicines-Specific (BMQ-S) and the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) 2 weeks after intervention. Results 21 enrolled patients (11 intervention) all completed to follow-up. MMAS-8 was very similar in the intervention and control groups. In BMQ-S the intervention group had a mean (SD) necessity score of 21 (4) and a concern score of 12 (6), corresponding results in the control group were 21 (3) and 10 (5). However, since there was a difference in BMQ-S at baseline, seven intervention patients shifted towards more positive beliefs compared with two control patients. Conclusions No difference was found in adherence and beliefs at follow-up. However, after consultation, a larger proportion of patients changed towards more positive beliefs compared with control. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy: Science and Practice
volume
21
issue
2
pages
102 - 107
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000336518600010
  • scopus:84895447658
ISSN
2047-9964
DOI
10.1136/ejhpharm-2013-000402
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b81a553a-f1ee-43dc-93c2-ee8008e19bd4 (old id 4559366)
date added to LUP
2014-08-01 07:43:26
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:56:20
@article{b81a553a-f1ee-43dc-93c2-ee8008e19bd4,
  abstract     = {Objectives Clinical outcomes in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease depend on the patients' adherence to prescribed medicines. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centred approach used to change different health behaviours. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a clinical pharmacist's consultation on beliefs about medicines and self-reported medication adherence among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods CHD-patients participating in a prevention programme at the Kalmar County Hospital were randomised to control or intervention. The intervention consisted of a medication review focused on cardiovascular drugs, and a semistructured interview based on MI-approach, with a follow-up phone call 2 weeks later. The intervention was conducted by a clinical pharmacist at the cardiology unit 3 months postdischarge. Primary outcome measures were the results from the Beliefs about Medicines-Specific (BMQ-S) and the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) 2 weeks after intervention. Results 21 enrolled patients (11 intervention) all completed to follow-up. MMAS-8 was very similar in the intervention and control groups. In BMQ-S the intervention group had a mean (SD) necessity score of 21 (4) and a concern score of 12 (6), corresponding results in the control group were 21 (3) and 10 (5). However, since there was a difference in BMQ-S at baseline, seven intervention patients shifted towards more positive beliefs compared with two control patients. Conclusions No difference was found in adherence and beliefs at follow-up. However, after consultation, a larger proportion of patients changed towards more positive beliefs compared with control.},
  author       = {Ostbring, Malin Johansson and Eriksson, Tommy and Petersson, Goran and Hellstrom, Lina},
  issn         = {2047-9964},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {102--107},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy: Science and Practice},
  title        = {Medication beliefs and self-reported adherence-results of a pharmacist's consultation: a pilot study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ejhpharm-2013-000402},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2014},
}