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Enhanced laminin adsorption on nanowires compared to flat surfaces.

Hammarin, Greger; Persson, Henrik; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P and Prinz, Christelle LU (2014) In Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces 122. p.85-89
Abstract
Semiconductor nanowires are widely used to interface living cells, and numerous nanowire-based devices have been developed to manipulate or sense cell behavior. We have, however, little knowledge on the nature of the cell-nanowire interface. Laminin is an extracellular matrix protein promoting cell attachment and growth. Here, we used a method based on fluorescence microscopy and measured the relative amount of laminin adsorbed on nanowires compared to flat surfaces. The amount of adsorbed laminin per surface area is up to 4 times higher on 55nm diameter gallium phosphide nanowires compared to the flat gallium phosphide surface between the nanowires. We show that this enhanced adsorption on nanowires cannot be attributed to electrostatic... (More)
Semiconductor nanowires are widely used to interface living cells, and numerous nanowire-based devices have been developed to manipulate or sense cell behavior. We have, however, little knowledge on the nature of the cell-nanowire interface. Laminin is an extracellular matrix protein promoting cell attachment and growth. Here, we used a method based on fluorescence microscopy and measured the relative amount of laminin adsorbed on nanowires compared to flat surfaces. The amount of adsorbed laminin per surface area is up to 4 times higher on 55nm diameter gallium phosphide nanowires compared to the flat gallium phosphide surface between the nanowires. We show that this enhanced adsorption on nanowires cannot be attributed to electrostatic effects, nor to differences in surface chemistry, but possibly to pure geometrical effects, as increasing the nanowire diameter results in a decreased amount of adsorbed protein. The increased adsorption of laminin on nanowires may explain the exceptionally beneficial properties of nanowire substrates for cellular growth reported in the literature since laminin is often used as surface coating prior to cell cultures in order to promote cell growth, and also because primary cell suspensions contain endogenous laminin. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
volume
122
pages
85 - 89
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:25024109
  • wos:000343612900012
  • scopus:84904369869
ISSN
1873-4367
DOI
10.1016/j.colsurfb.2014.06.048
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d0bd577-6c62-476c-b3f4-5f8b785b9027 (old id 4582291)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25024109?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-08-07 23:37:31
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:16:59
@article{3d0bd577-6c62-476c-b3f4-5f8b785b9027,
  abstract     = {Semiconductor nanowires are widely used to interface living cells, and numerous nanowire-based devices have been developed to manipulate or sense cell behavior. We have, however, little knowledge on the nature of the cell-nanowire interface. Laminin is an extracellular matrix protein promoting cell attachment and growth. Here, we used a method based on fluorescence microscopy and measured the relative amount of laminin adsorbed on nanowires compared to flat surfaces. The amount of adsorbed laminin per surface area is up to 4 times higher on 55nm diameter gallium phosphide nanowires compared to the flat gallium phosphide surface between the nanowires. We show that this enhanced adsorption on nanowires cannot be attributed to electrostatic effects, nor to differences in surface chemistry, but possibly to pure geometrical effects, as increasing the nanowire diameter results in a decreased amount of adsorbed protein. The increased adsorption of laminin on nanowires may explain the exceptionally beneficial properties of nanowire substrates for cellular growth reported in the literature since laminin is often used as surface coating prior to cell cultures in order to promote cell growth, and also because primary cell suspensions contain endogenous laminin.},
  author       = {Hammarin, Greger and Persson, Henrik and Dabkowska, Aleksandra P and Prinz, Christelle},
  issn         = {1873-4367},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {85--89},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces},
  title        = {Enhanced laminin adsorption on nanowires compared to flat surfaces.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2014.06.048},
  volume       = {122},
  year         = {2014},
}