Advanced

Daylight compliance of residential spaces : Comparison of different performance criteria and association with room geometry and urban density

Bournas, I. LU (2020) In Building and Environment 185.
Abstract

Currently, policy makers in Sweden are considering updating building regulations with respect to daylight provision. Given this context, the present paper aims to provide insight on the level of compliance of residential spaces when tested against five daylight performance criteria. These included the criterion currently in force in Sweden, the two performance criteria set by European Standard EN17037, a daylight factor-based criterion (BREEAM) and a climate-based criterion founded on the UDI metric. Compliance was tested by performing Radiance simulations on a representative sample of Swedish multi-dwelling buildings, including 10888 rooms. The criteria were compared according to the compliance they yield for different buildings and... (More)

Currently, policy makers in Sweden are considering updating building regulations with respect to daylight provision. Given this context, the present paper aims to provide insight on the level of compliance of residential spaces when tested against five daylight performance criteria. These included the criterion currently in force in Sweden, the two performance criteria set by European Standard EN17037, a daylight factor-based criterion (BREEAM) and a climate-based criterion founded on the UDI metric. Compliance was tested by performing Radiance simulations on a representative sample of Swedish multi-dwelling buildings, including 10888 rooms. The criteria were compared according to the compliance they yield for different buildings and room types. Compliance per criterion was also associated with room geometry to evaluate which geometric measures affect it most substantially, and with urban density to evaluate which criterion best captures the effect of surrounding obstructions. Results indicate that the implementation of different criteria deem different building types to be better or worse performing. A consistent finding is that the vast majority of evaluated spaces are deemed to be incompliant when tested against the daylight-factor-based criterion of EN17037, which is significantly harder to comply with compared to its climate-based counterpart. The highest compliance is achieved when testing against the current Swedish criterion. The results also indicate that the Vertical Sky Component and glass-to-floor ratio affect compliance most substantially compared to other geometric measures. Finally, when daylight compliance was associated with urban density, the strongest association was acquired when rooms were tested using the UDI criterion.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Compliance, Daylight, Geometry, Residential, Urban density
in
Building and Environment
volume
185
article number
107276
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85091745269
ISSN
0360-1323
DOI
10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.107276
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
459a6a41-83a1-40d6-a4a0-a1d957bd0af0
date added to LUP
2020-10-29 16:06:36
date last changed
2020-10-30 01:12:33
@article{459a6a41-83a1-40d6-a4a0-a1d957bd0af0,
  abstract     = {<p>Currently, policy makers in Sweden are considering updating building regulations with respect to daylight provision. Given this context, the present paper aims to provide insight on the level of compliance of residential spaces when tested against five daylight performance criteria. These included the criterion currently in force in Sweden, the two performance criteria set by European Standard EN17037, a daylight factor-based criterion (BREEAM) and a climate-based criterion founded on the UDI metric. Compliance was tested by performing Radiance simulations on a representative sample of Swedish multi-dwelling buildings, including 10888 rooms. The criteria were compared according to the compliance they yield for different buildings and room types. Compliance per criterion was also associated with room geometry to evaluate which geometric measures affect it most substantially, and with urban density to evaluate which criterion best captures the effect of surrounding obstructions. Results indicate that the implementation of different criteria deem different building types to be better or worse performing. A consistent finding is that the vast majority of evaluated spaces are deemed to be incompliant when tested against the daylight-factor-based criterion of EN17037, which is significantly harder to comply with compared to its climate-based counterpart. The highest compliance is achieved when testing against the current Swedish criterion. The results also indicate that the Vertical Sky Component and glass-to-floor ratio affect compliance most substantially compared to other geometric measures. Finally, when daylight compliance was associated with urban density, the strongest association was acquired when rooms were tested using the UDI criterion.</p>},
  author       = {Bournas, I.},
  issn         = {0360-1323},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Building and Environment},
  title        = {Daylight compliance of residential spaces : Comparison of different performance criteria and association with room geometry and urban density},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.107276},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.107276},
  volume       = {185},
  year         = {2020},
}