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Association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone with mortality among middle-aged and older European men

Lee, David M.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; O'Neill, Terence W.; Pendleton, Neil; Pye, Stephen R.; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Gielen, Evelien; Claessens, Frank and Bartfai, Gyoergy, et al. (2014) In Age and Ageing 43(4). p.528-535
Abstract
Setting: prospective cohort analysis within the European Male Ageing Study. Participants: 2,816 community-dwelling men aged 40-79 years at baseline. Methods: Cox regression was used to examine the association of all-cause mortality with 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)(2)D and PTH; cardiovascular and cancer mortality were modelled using competing-risks regression. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for Cox models; sub-hazard ratios (SHR) and 95% CIs for competing-risks models. Results: a total of 187 men died during a median of 4.3 years of follow-up. Serum levels of 25(OH)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.16, 1.81) and 1,25(OH)(2)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.44) were associated... (More)
Setting: prospective cohort analysis within the European Male Ageing Study. Participants: 2,816 community-dwelling men aged 40-79 years at baseline. Methods: Cox regression was used to examine the association of all-cause mortality with 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)(2)D and PTH; cardiovascular and cancer mortality were modelled using competing-risks regression. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for Cox models; sub-hazard ratios (SHR) and 95% CIs for competing-risks models. Results: a total of 187 men died during a median of 4.3 years of follow-up. Serum levels of 25(OH)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.16, 1.81) and 1,25(OH)(2)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.44) were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for age, centre, smoking, self-reported morbidities, physical activity and functional performance. Only levels of 25(OH)D < 25 nmol/l predicted cancer mortality (SHR = 3.33; 95% CI = 1.38, 8.04). Conclusion: lower 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D levels independently predicted all-cause mortality in middle-aged and older European men. Associations with cancer mortality were only observed among men with very low levels of 25(OH)D. These associations were only partially explained by the range of adverse health and lifestyle factors measured here. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1, parathyroid hormone, mortality, population based, older people, 25-hydroxyvitamin D
in
Age and Ageing
volume
43
issue
4
pages
528 - 535
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000338502500016
  • scopus:84903208578
ISSN
1468-2834
DOI
10.1093/ageing/aft206
language
English
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yes
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1bc6a942-bf49-4bf5-9c30-58063748ff31 (old id 4602739)
date added to LUP
2014-09-04 14:18:26
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:13:31
@article{1bc6a942-bf49-4bf5-9c30-58063748ff31,
  abstract     = {Setting: prospective cohort analysis within the European Male Ageing Study. Participants: 2,816 community-dwelling men aged 40-79 years at baseline. Methods: Cox regression was used to examine the association of all-cause mortality with 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)(2)D and PTH; cardiovascular and cancer mortality were modelled using competing-risks regression. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for Cox models; sub-hazard ratios (SHR) and 95% CIs for competing-risks models. Results: a total of 187 men died during a median of 4.3 years of follow-up. Serum levels of 25(OH)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.16, 1.81) and 1,25(OH)(2)D (per 1 SD decrease: HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.44) were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for age, centre, smoking, self-reported morbidities, physical activity and functional performance. Only levels of 25(OH)D &lt; 25 nmol/l predicted cancer mortality (SHR = 3.33; 95% CI = 1.38, 8.04). Conclusion: lower 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D levels independently predicted all-cause mortality in middle-aged and older European men. Associations with cancer mortality were only observed among men with very low levels of 25(OH)D. These associations were only partially explained by the range of adverse health and lifestyle factors measured here.},
  author       = {Lee, David M. and Vanderschueren, Dirk and Boonen, Steven and O'Neill, Terence W. and Pendleton, Neil and Pye, Stephen R. and Ravindrarajah, Rathi and Gielen, Evelien and Claessens, Frank and Bartfai, Gyoergy and Casanueva, Felipe F. and Finn, Joseph D. and Forti, Gianni and Giwercman, Aleksander and Han, Thang S. and Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T. and Kula, Krzysztof and Lean, Michael E. J. and Punab, Margus and Wu, Frederick C. W.},
  issn         = {1468-2834},
  keyword      = {25-dihydroxyvitamin D,1,parathyroid hormone,mortality,population based,older people,25-hydroxyvitamin D},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {528--535},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Age and Ageing},
  title        = {Association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone with mortality among middle-aged and older European men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/aft206},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2014},
}