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Smoking as a risk factor for the radiological severity of rheumatoid arthritis: a study on six cohorts

de Rooy, D. P. C.; van Nies, J. A. B.; C Kapetanovic, Meliha LU ; Kristjansdottir, H.; Andersson, Maria LU ; Forslind, Kristina LU ; van der Heijde, D. M. F. M.; Gregersen, P. K.; Lindqvist, Elisabet LU and Huizinga, T. W. J., et al. (2014) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 73(7). p.1384-1387
Abstract
Background Smoking is a risk factor for the development of anti -citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether smoking predisposes to severe joint damage progression is not known, since deleterious, protective and neutral observations have been made. Objective To determine the effect of smoking on joint damage progression. Methods Smoking status was assessed in 3158 RA patients included in six cohorts (Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (Leiden-EAC), BARFOT, Lund, Iceland, NDB and Wichita). In total 9412 radiographs were assessed. Multivariate normal regression and linear regression analyses were performed. Data were summarised in a random effects inverse variance meta-analysis. Results When comparing... (More)
Background Smoking is a risk factor for the development of anti -citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether smoking predisposes to severe joint damage progression is not known, since deleterious, protective and neutral observations have been made. Objective To determine the effect of smoking on joint damage progression. Methods Smoking status was assessed in 3158 RA patients included in six cohorts (Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (Leiden-EAC), BARFOT, Lund, Iceland, NDB and Wichita). In total 9412 radiographs were assessed. Multivariate normal regression and linear regression analyses were performed. Data were summarised in a random effects inverse variance meta-analysis. Results When comparing radiological progression for RA patients that were never, past and current smokers, smoking was significantly associated with more severe joint damage in Leiden-EAC (p=0.042) and BARFOT (p=0.015) RA patients. No significant associations were found in the other cohorts, though a meta-analysis on the six cohorts showed significantly more severe joint damage progression in smokers (p=0.01). Since smoking predisposes to ACPA, analyses were repeated with ACPA as additional adjustment factor. Then the association was lost (meta-analysis p=0.29). Conclusions This multi-cohort study indicated that the effect of smoking on joint damage is mediated via ACPA and that smoking is not an independent risk factor for radiological progression in RA. (Less)
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Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
73
issue
7
pages
1384 - 1387
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000337914300029
  • scopus:84902298413
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203940
language
English
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yes
id
1d4a5c5e-b548-48fb-ad54-79f5ae8f0734 (old id 4608906)
date added to LUP
2014-09-01 07:37:48
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2017-09-10 04:14:42
@article{1d4a5c5e-b548-48fb-ad54-79f5ae8f0734,
  abstract     = {Background Smoking is a risk factor for the development of anti -citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether smoking predisposes to severe joint damage progression is not known, since deleterious, protective and neutral observations have been made. Objective To determine the effect of smoking on joint damage progression. Methods Smoking status was assessed in 3158 RA patients included in six cohorts (Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (Leiden-EAC), BARFOT, Lund, Iceland, NDB and Wichita). In total 9412 radiographs were assessed. Multivariate normal regression and linear regression analyses were performed. Data were summarised in a random effects inverse variance meta-analysis. Results When comparing radiological progression for RA patients that were never, past and current smokers, smoking was significantly associated with more severe joint damage in Leiden-EAC (p=0.042) and BARFOT (p=0.015) RA patients. No significant associations were found in the other cohorts, though a meta-analysis on the six cohorts showed significantly more severe joint damage progression in smokers (p=0.01). Since smoking predisposes to ACPA, analyses were repeated with ACPA as additional adjustment factor. Then the association was lost (meta-analysis p=0.29). Conclusions This multi-cohort study indicated that the effect of smoking on joint damage is mediated via ACPA and that smoking is not an independent risk factor for radiological progression in RA.},
  author       = {de Rooy, D. P. C. and van Nies, J. A. B. and C Kapetanovic, Meliha and Kristjansdottir, H. and Andersson, Maria and Forslind, Kristina and van der Heijde, D. M. F. M. and Gregersen, P. K. and Lindqvist, Elisabet and Huizinga, T. W. J. and Grondal, G. and Svensson, B. and van der Helm-van Mil, A. H. M.},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1384--1387},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Smoking as a risk factor for the radiological severity of rheumatoid arthritis: a study on six cohorts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203940},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2014},
}