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Why some parasites are widespread and abundant while others are local and rare?

Robalinho Lima, Marcos LU and Bensch, Staffan LU (2014) In Molecular Ecology 23(13). p.3130-3132
Abstract
Abundances and distributions of species are usually associated. This implies that as a species declines in abundance so does the number of sites it occupies. Conversely, when there is an increase in a species' range size, it is usually followed by an increase in population size (Gaston etal. ). This ecological phenomenon, also known as the abundance-occupancy relationship (AOR), is well documented in several species of animals and plants (Gaston etal. ) but has been little investigated in parasites. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Drovetski etal. () investigated the AOR in avian haemosporidians (vector-borne blood parasites) using data from four well-sampled bird communities. In support of the AOR, the research group found that the... (More)
Abundances and distributions of species are usually associated. This implies that as a species declines in abundance so does the number of sites it occupies. Conversely, when there is an increase in a species' range size, it is usually followed by an increase in population size (Gaston etal. ). This ecological phenomenon, also known as the abundance-occupancy relationship (AOR), is well documented in several species of animals and plants (Gaston etal. ) but has been little investigated in parasites. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Drovetski etal. () investigated the AOR in avian haemosporidians (vector-borne blood parasites) using data from four well-sampled bird communities. In support of the AOR, the research group found that the abundance of parasite cytochrome b lineages (a commonly used proxy for species identification within this group of parasites) was positively linked with the abundance of susceptible avian host species and that the most abundant haemospordian lineages were those with larger ranges. Drovetski etal. () also found evidence for both hypotheses proposed to explain the AOR in parasites: the trade-off hypothesis (TOH) and the niche-breadth hypothesis (NBH). Interestingly, the main predictor of the AOR was the number of susceptible hosts (i.e. number of infected birds) and not the number of host species the parasites were able to exploit. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Area-occupancy relationship, avian malaria, niche-breadth hypothesis, trade-off hypothesis
in
Molecular Ecology
volume
23
issue
13
pages
3130 - 3132
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000338014900002
  • scopus:84903289068
ISSN
0962-1083
DOI
10.1111/mec.12809
project
BECC
Malaria in birds
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
70a37b13-33b3-4fa2-8eff-a01d71da00d5 (old id 4608987)
date added to LUP
2014-08-28 16:48:38
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:12:46
@misc{70a37b13-33b3-4fa2-8eff-a01d71da00d5,
  abstract     = {Abundances and distributions of species are usually associated. This implies that as a species declines in abundance so does the number of sites it occupies. Conversely, when there is an increase in a species' range size, it is usually followed by an increase in population size (Gaston etal. ). This ecological phenomenon, also known as the abundance-occupancy relationship (AOR), is well documented in several species of animals and plants (Gaston etal. ) but has been little investigated in parasites. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Drovetski etal. () investigated the AOR in avian haemosporidians (vector-borne blood parasites) using data from four well-sampled bird communities. In support of the AOR, the research group found that the abundance of parasite cytochrome b lineages (a commonly used proxy for species identification within this group of parasites) was positively linked with the abundance of susceptible avian host species and that the most abundant haemospordian lineages were those with larger ranges. Drovetski etal. () also found evidence for both hypotheses proposed to explain the AOR in parasites: the trade-off hypothesis (TOH) and the niche-breadth hypothesis (NBH). Interestingly, the main predictor of the AOR was the number of susceptible hosts (i.e. number of infected birds) and not the number of host species the parasites were able to exploit.},
  author       = {Robalinho Lima, Marcos and Bensch, Staffan},
  issn         = {0962-1083},
  keyword      = {Area-occupancy relationship,avian malaria,niche-breadth hypothesis,trade-off hypothesis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {3130--3132},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Molecular Ecology},
  title        = {Why some parasites are widespread and abundant while others are local and rare?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.12809},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2014},
}