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Encoding of social signals in all three electrosensory pathways of Eigenmannia virescens.

Stöckl, Anna LU ; Sinz, Fabian; Benda, Jan and Grewe, Jan (2014) In Journal of Neurophysiology 112(9). p.2076-2091
Abstract
Extracting complementary features in parallel pathways is a widely used strategy for a robust representation of sensory signals. Weakly electric fish offer the rare opportunity to study complementary encoding of social signals in all of its electrosensory pathways. Electrosensory information is conveyed in three parallel pathways: two receptor types of the tuberous (active) system and one receptor type of the ampullary (passive) system. Modulations of the fish's own electric field are sensed by these receptors and used in navigation, prey-detection and communication. We studied the neuronal representation of electric communication signals (called chirps) in the ampullary and the two tuberous pathways of Eigenmannia virescens. We first... (More)
Extracting complementary features in parallel pathways is a widely used strategy for a robust representation of sensory signals. Weakly electric fish offer the rare opportunity to study complementary encoding of social signals in all of its electrosensory pathways. Electrosensory information is conveyed in three parallel pathways: two receptor types of the tuberous (active) system and one receptor type of the ampullary (passive) system. Modulations of the fish's own electric field are sensed by these receptors and used in navigation, prey-detection and communication. We studied the neuronal representation of electric communication signals (called chirps) in the ampullary and the two tuberous pathways of Eigenmannia virescens. We first characterized different kinds of chirps observed in behavioral experiments. Since Eigenmannia chirps simultaneously drive all three types of receptors, we studied their responses in in vivo electrophysiological recordings. Our results demonstrate that different electroreceptor types encode different aspects of the stimuli and each appears best suited to convey information about a certain chirp type. A decoding analysis of single neurons and small populations shows that this specialization leads to a complementary representation of information in the tuberous and ampullary receptors. This suggests that a potential readout mechanism should combine information provided by the parallel processing streams to improve chirp detectability. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Neurophysiology
volume
112
issue
9
pages
2076 - 2091
publisher
American Physiological Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:25098964
  • wos:000344995100006
  • scopus:84908432905
ISSN
0022-3077
DOI
10.1152/jn.00116.2014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fd7c3c32-2c9f-40d4-a573-ace99abca2b6 (old id 4615504)
date added to LUP
2014-10-08 13:39:00
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:24:10
@article{fd7c3c32-2c9f-40d4-a573-ace99abca2b6,
  abstract     = {Extracting complementary features in parallel pathways is a widely used strategy for a robust representation of sensory signals. Weakly electric fish offer the rare opportunity to study complementary encoding of social signals in all of its electrosensory pathways. Electrosensory information is conveyed in three parallel pathways: two receptor types of the tuberous (active) system and one receptor type of the ampullary (passive) system. Modulations of the fish's own electric field are sensed by these receptors and used in navigation, prey-detection and communication. We studied the neuronal representation of electric communication signals (called chirps) in the ampullary and the two tuberous pathways of Eigenmannia virescens. We first characterized different kinds of chirps observed in behavioral experiments. Since Eigenmannia chirps simultaneously drive all three types of receptors, we studied their responses in in vivo electrophysiological recordings. Our results demonstrate that different electroreceptor types encode different aspects of the stimuli and each appears best suited to convey information about a certain chirp type. A decoding analysis of single neurons and small populations shows that this specialization leads to a complementary representation of information in the tuberous and ampullary receptors. This suggests that a potential readout mechanism should combine information provided by the parallel processing streams to improve chirp detectability.},
  author       = {Stöckl, Anna and Sinz, Fabian and Benda, Jan and Grewe, Jan},
  issn         = {0022-3077},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2076--2091},
  publisher    = {American Physiological Society},
  series       = {Journal of Neurophysiology},
  title        = {Encoding of social signals in all three electrosensory pathways of Eigenmannia virescens.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00116.2014},
  volume       = {112},
  year         = {2014},
}