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Participation weighting based on sociodemographic register data improved external validity in a population-based cohort study

Bonander, Carl; Nilsson, Anton LU ; Björk, Jonas LU ; Bergström, Göran M.L. and Strömberg, Ulf LU (2019) In Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 108. p.54-63
Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether inverse probability of participation weighting (IPPW) using register data on sociodemographic and disease history variables can improve external validity in a cohort study with selective participation. Study Design and Setting: We fitted various IPPW models by logistic regression using register data for the participants (n = 1,111) and nonparticipants (n = 1,132) of a Swedish cohort study. For each of six diagnostic groups, we then estimated (1) weighted disease prevalence proportions and (2) weighted cross-sectional associations (odds ratios) between sociodemographic variables and disease prevalence. Using register data on the remaining individuals of the entire study population of men and women aged... (More)

Objective: To investigate whether inverse probability of participation weighting (IPPW) using register data on sociodemographic and disease history variables can improve external validity in a cohort study with selective participation. Study Design and Setting: We fitted various IPPW models by logistic regression using register data for the participants (n = 1,111) and nonparticipants (n = 1,132) of a Swedish cohort study. For each of six diagnostic groups, we then estimated (1) weighted disease prevalence proportions and (2) weighted cross-sectional associations (odds ratios) between sociodemographic variables and disease prevalence. Using register data on the remaining individuals of the entire study population of men and women aged 50-64 years (n = 22,259), we addressed how the choice of variables used for IPPW influenced estimation errors. Results: Disease prevalence proportions were generally underestimated in the absence of IPPW but became markedly closer to population values after IPPW using sociodemographic variables. We found limited evidence of selective participation bias in association estimates, but IPPW improved external validity when bias was present. Conclusions: IPPW using sociodemographic register data can improve the external validity of disease prevalence estimates in cohort studies with selective participation. The performance of IPPW for association estimates merits further investigations in longitudinal settings and larger cohorts.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
External validity, Generalizability, Inverse probability weighting, Nonresponse bias, Propensity score, Transportability
in
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
volume
108
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85059513600
ISSN
0895-4356
DOI
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2018.12.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
462722c1-fcc1-48f0-9a8a-5ef9a606a2a4
date added to LUP
2019-01-16 14:51:47
date last changed
2019-04-02 09:14:23
@article{462722c1-fcc1-48f0-9a8a-5ef9a606a2a4,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To investigate whether inverse probability of participation weighting (IPPW) using register data on sociodemographic and disease history variables can improve external validity in a cohort study with selective participation. Study Design and Setting: We fitted various IPPW models by logistic regression using register data for the participants (n = 1,111) and nonparticipants (n = 1,132) of a Swedish cohort study. For each of six diagnostic groups, we then estimated (1) weighted disease prevalence proportions and (2) weighted cross-sectional associations (odds ratios) between sociodemographic variables and disease prevalence. Using register data on the remaining individuals of the entire study population of men and women aged 50-64 years (n = 22,259), we addressed how the choice of variables used for IPPW influenced estimation errors. Results: Disease prevalence proportions were generally underestimated in the absence of IPPW but became markedly closer to population values after IPPW using sociodemographic variables. We found limited evidence of selective participation bias in association estimates, but IPPW improved external validity when bias was present. Conclusions: IPPW using sociodemographic register data can improve the external validity of disease prevalence estimates in cohort studies with selective participation. The performance of IPPW for association estimates merits further investigations in longitudinal settings and larger cohorts.</p>},
  author       = {Bonander, Carl and Nilsson, Anton and Björk, Jonas and Bergström, Göran M.L. and Strömberg, Ulf},
  issn         = {0895-4356},
  keyword      = {External validity,Generalizability,Inverse probability weighting,Nonresponse bias,Propensity score,Transportability},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {54--63},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Epidemiology},
  title        = {Participation weighting based on sociodemographic register data improved external validity in a population-based cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2018.12.011},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2019},
}