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Assessing above-ground woody debris dynamics along a gradient of elevation in Amazonian cloud forests in Peru: balancing above-ground inputs and respiration outputs

Gurdak, Daniel J.; Aragao, Luiz E. O. C.; Rozas-Davila, Angela; Huasco, Walter H.; Cabrera, Karina G.; Doughty, Chris E.; Farfan-Rios, William; Silva-Espejo, Javier E.; Metcalfe, Dan LU and Silman, Miles R., et al. (2014) In Plant Ecology & Diversity 7(1-2). p.143-160
Abstract
Background: Dead biomass, including woody debris (WD), is an important component of the carbon cycle in tropical forests. Aims: This study analyses WD (>2 cm) and other above-ground fluxes in mature tropical forest plots along an elevational gradient (210-3025 m above sea level) in southern Peru. Methods: This work was based on inventories of fine and coarse WD (FWD and CWD, respectively), above-ground biomass, and field-based and experimental respiration measurements. Results: Total WD stocks ranged from 6.26 Mg C ha(-1) at 3025 m to 11.48 Mg C ha(-1) at 2720 m. WD respiration was significantly correlated with moisture content (P < 0.001; R-2 = 0.25), temperature (P < 0.001; R-2 = 0.12) and wood density (P < 0.001; R-2 =... (More)
Background: Dead biomass, including woody debris (WD), is an important component of the carbon cycle in tropical forests. Aims: This study analyses WD (>2 cm) and other above-ground fluxes in mature tropical forest plots along an elevational gradient (210-3025 m above sea level) in southern Peru. Methods: This work was based on inventories of fine and coarse WD (FWD and CWD, respectively), above-ground biomass, and field-based and experimental respiration measurements. Results: Total WD stocks ranged from 6.26 Mg C ha(-1) at 3025 m to 11.48 Mg C ha(-1) at 2720 m. WD respiration was significantly correlated with moisture content (P < 0.001; R-2 = 0.25), temperature (P < 0.001; R-2 = 0.12) and wood density (P < 0.001; R-2 = 0.16). Controlled experiments showed that both water content and temperature increased respiration rates of individual WD samples. The full breadth of the temperature sensitivity coefficient, or Q(10), estimates, ranging from 1.14-2.13, was low compared to other studies. In addition, temperature sensitivity of WD respiration was greater for higher elevations. Conclusions: Carbon stocks, mortality and turnover of above-ground biomass varied widely and were not significantly related with elevation or slope. This study demonstrates that some forests may be a carbon source due to legacies of disturbance and increasing temperatures, which may cause additional, short-term carbon efflux from WD. Predictions of tropical forest carbon cycles under future climate should incorporate WD dynamics and related feedback. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
Amazon Basin, Andes, carbon balance, cloud forest, montane forest, necromass, respiration, temperature sensitivity, tropical forest, turnover
in
Plant Ecology & Diversity
volume
7
issue
1-2
pages
143 - 160
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000336082900010
  • scopus:84893215827
ISSN
1755-0874
DOI
10.1080/17550874.2013.818073
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
541941f2-c2fb-4c36-8778-3a81e80b5a7b (old id 4643841)
date added to LUP
2014-09-26 07:57:31
date last changed
2017-04-23 03:02:49
@article{541941f2-c2fb-4c36-8778-3a81e80b5a7b,
  abstract     = {Background: Dead biomass, including woody debris (WD), is an important component of the carbon cycle in tropical forests. Aims: This study analyses WD (&gt;2 cm) and other above-ground fluxes in mature tropical forest plots along an elevational gradient (210-3025 m above sea level) in southern Peru. Methods: This work was based on inventories of fine and coarse WD (FWD and CWD, respectively), above-ground biomass, and field-based and experimental respiration measurements. Results: Total WD stocks ranged from 6.26 Mg C ha(-1) at 3025 m to 11.48 Mg C ha(-1) at 2720 m. WD respiration was significantly correlated with moisture content (P &lt; 0.001; R-2 = 0.25), temperature (P &lt; 0.001; R-2 = 0.12) and wood density (P &lt; 0.001; R-2 = 0.16). Controlled experiments showed that both water content and temperature increased respiration rates of individual WD samples. The full breadth of the temperature sensitivity coefficient, or Q(10), estimates, ranging from 1.14-2.13, was low compared to other studies. In addition, temperature sensitivity of WD respiration was greater for higher elevations. Conclusions: Carbon stocks, mortality and turnover of above-ground biomass varied widely and were not significantly related with elevation or slope. This study demonstrates that some forests may be a carbon source due to legacies of disturbance and increasing temperatures, which may cause additional, short-term carbon efflux from WD. Predictions of tropical forest carbon cycles under future climate should incorporate WD dynamics and related feedback.},
  author       = {Gurdak, Daniel J. and Aragao, Luiz E. O. C. and Rozas-Davila, Angela and Huasco, Walter H. and Cabrera, Karina G. and Doughty, Chris E. and Farfan-Rios, William and Silva-Espejo, Javier E. and Metcalfe, Dan and Silman, Miles R. and Malhi, Yadvinder},
  issn         = {1755-0874},
  keyword      = {Amazon Basin,Andes,carbon balance,cloud forest,montane forest,necromass,respiration,temperature sensitivity,tropical forest,turnover},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {143--160},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Plant Ecology & Diversity},
  title        = {Assessing above-ground woody debris dynamics along a gradient of elevation in Amazonian cloud forests in Peru: balancing above-ground inputs and respiration outputs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2013.818073},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2014},
}