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Application of nitrogen fertilizer to a boreal pine forest has a negative impact on the respiration of ectomycorrhizal hyphae

Vallack, Harry W.; Leronni, Vincenzo; Metcalfe, Dan LU ; Hogberg, Peter; Ineson, Phil and Subke, Jens-Arne (2012) In Plant and Soil 352(1-2). p.405-417
Abstract
Aims There is evidence that increased N inputs to boreal forests, via atmospheric deposition or intentional fertilization, may impact negatively on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi leading to a reduced flux of plant-derived carbon (C) back to the atmosphere via ECM. Our aim was to investigate the impact of N fertilization of a Pinus sylvestris (L.) forest stand on the return of recently photoassimilated C via the ECM component of soil respiration. Methods We used an in situ, large-scale, C-13-CO2 isotopic pulse labelling approach and monitored the C-13 label return using soil gas efflux chambers placed over three different types of soil collar to distinguish between heterotrophic (R-H), autotrophic (R-A; partitioned further into contributions... (More)
Aims There is evidence that increased N inputs to boreal forests, via atmospheric deposition or intentional fertilization, may impact negatively on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi leading to a reduced flux of plant-derived carbon (C) back to the atmosphere via ECM. Our aim was to investigate the impact of N fertilization of a Pinus sylvestris (L.) forest stand on the return of recently photoassimilated C via the ECM component of soil respiration. Methods We used an in situ, large-scale, C-13-CO2 isotopic pulse labelling approach and monitored the C-13 label return using soil gas efflux chambers placed over three different types of soil collar to distinguish between heterotrophic (R-H), autotrophic (R-A; partitioned further into contributions from ECM hyphae and total R-A) and total (R-S) soil respiration. Results The impact of N fertilization was to significantly reduce R-A, particularly respiration via extramatrical ECM hyphae. ECM hyphal flux in control plots showed substantial spatial variability, resulting in mean flux estimates exceeding estimates of total R-A, while ECM contributions to R-A in N treated plots were estimated at around 30%. Conclusion Significant impacts on soil C cycling may be caused by reduced plant C allocation to ECM fungi in response to increased N inputs to boreal forests; ecosystem models so far lack this detail. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
(CO2)-C-13, Pulse labelling, Soil CO2 efflux, Ectomycorrhizas, Soil, respiration, Boreal forest
in
Plant and Soil
volume
352
issue
1-2
pages
405 - 417
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000302421300029
  • scopus:84858006168
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1007/s11104-011-1005-6
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
011d8feb-9164-4279-8a72-0099cf44ca12 (old id 4643918)
date added to LUP
2014-09-26 07:49:45
date last changed
2017-03-19 03:46:26
@article{011d8feb-9164-4279-8a72-0099cf44ca12,
  abstract     = {Aims There is evidence that increased N inputs to boreal forests, via atmospheric deposition or intentional fertilization, may impact negatively on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi leading to a reduced flux of plant-derived carbon (C) back to the atmosphere via ECM. Our aim was to investigate the impact of N fertilization of a Pinus sylvestris (L.) forest stand on the return of recently photoassimilated C via the ECM component of soil respiration. Methods We used an in situ, large-scale, C-13-CO2 isotopic pulse labelling approach and monitored the C-13 label return using soil gas efflux chambers placed over three different types of soil collar to distinguish between heterotrophic (R-H), autotrophic (R-A; partitioned further into contributions from ECM hyphae and total R-A) and total (R-S) soil respiration. Results The impact of N fertilization was to significantly reduce R-A, particularly respiration via extramatrical ECM hyphae. ECM hyphal flux in control plots showed substantial spatial variability, resulting in mean flux estimates exceeding estimates of total R-A, while ECM contributions to R-A in N treated plots were estimated at around 30%. Conclusion Significant impacts on soil C cycling may be caused by reduced plant C allocation to ECM fungi in response to increased N inputs to boreal forests; ecosystem models so far lack this detail.},
  author       = {Vallack, Harry W. and Leronni, Vincenzo and Metcalfe, Dan and Hogberg, Peter and Ineson, Phil and Subke, Jens-Arne},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  keyword      = {(CO2)-C-13,Pulse labelling,Soil CO2 efflux,Ectomycorrhizas,Soil,respiration,Boreal forest},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {405--417},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant and Soil},
  title        = {Application of nitrogen fertilizer to a boreal pine forest has a negative impact on the respiration of ectomycorrhizal hyphae},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-011-1005-6},
  volume       = {352},
  year         = {2012},
}