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Specific root length as an indicator of environmental change

Ostonen, I.; Puttsepp, U.; Biel, C.; Alberton, O.; Bakker, M. R.; Lohmus, K.; Majdi, H.; Metcalfe, Dan LU ; Olsthoorn, A. F. M. and Pronk, A., et al. (2007) In Plant Biosystems 141(3). p.426-442
Abstract
Specific root length (SRL, m g(-1)) is probably the most frequently measured morphological parameter of fine roots. It is believed to characterize economic aspects of the root system and to be indicative of environmental changes. The main objectives of this paper were to review and summarize the published SRL data for different tree species throughout Europe and to assess SRL under varying environmental conditions. Meta-analysis was used to summarize the response of SRL to the following manipulated environmental conditions: fertilization, irrigation, elevated temperature, elevated CO(2), Al-stress, reduced light, heavy metal stress and physical disturbance of soil. SRL was found to be strongly dependent on the fine root classes, i.e. on... (More)
Specific root length (SRL, m g(-1)) is probably the most frequently measured morphological parameter of fine roots. It is believed to characterize economic aspects of the root system and to be indicative of environmental changes. The main objectives of this paper were to review and summarize the published SRL data for different tree species throughout Europe and to assess SRL under varying environmental conditions. Meta-analysis was used to summarize the response of SRL to the following manipulated environmental conditions: fertilization, irrigation, elevated temperature, elevated CO(2), Al-stress, reduced light, heavy metal stress and physical disturbance of soil. SRL was found to be strongly dependent on the fine root classes, i.e. on the ectomycorrhizal short roots (ECM), and on the roots < 0.5 mm, < 1 mm, < 2 mm and 1-2 mm in diameter SRL was largest for ECM and decreased with increasing diameter. Changes in soil factors influenced most strongly the SRL of ECM and roots < 0.5 mm. The variation in the SRL components, root diameter and root tissue density, and their impact on the SRL value were computed. Meta-analyses showed that SRL decreased significantly under fertilization and Al-stress; it responded negatively to reduced light, elevated temperature and CO(2). We suggest that SRL can be used successfully as an indicator of nutrient availability to trees in experimental conditions. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
environmental conditions, fertilization, fine root morphology, indicator, specific root length, stress
in
Plant Biosystems
volume
141
issue
3
pages
426 - 442
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000252341900015
  • scopus:36248954456
ISSN
1126-3504
DOI
10.1080/11263500701626069
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4a6d2c18-c7cf-46f3-94e7-df221016d28c (old id 4644606)
date added to LUP
2014-09-15 18:13:26
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:48:01
@article{4a6d2c18-c7cf-46f3-94e7-df221016d28c,
  abstract     = {Specific root length (SRL, m g(-1)) is probably the most frequently measured morphological parameter of fine roots. It is believed to characterize economic aspects of the root system and to be indicative of environmental changes. The main objectives of this paper were to review and summarize the published SRL data for different tree species throughout Europe and to assess SRL under varying environmental conditions. Meta-analysis was used to summarize the response of SRL to the following manipulated environmental conditions: fertilization, irrigation, elevated temperature, elevated CO(2), Al-stress, reduced light, heavy metal stress and physical disturbance of soil. SRL was found to be strongly dependent on the fine root classes, i.e. on the ectomycorrhizal short roots (ECM), and on the roots &lt; 0.5 mm, &lt; 1 mm, &lt; 2 mm and 1-2 mm in diameter SRL was largest for ECM and decreased with increasing diameter. Changes in soil factors influenced most strongly the SRL of ECM and roots &lt; 0.5 mm. The variation in the SRL components, root diameter and root tissue density, and their impact on the SRL value were computed. Meta-analyses showed that SRL decreased significantly under fertilization and Al-stress; it responded negatively to reduced light, elevated temperature and CO(2). We suggest that SRL can be used successfully as an indicator of nutrient availability to trees in experimental conditions.},
  author       = {Ostonen, I. and Puttsepp, U. and Biel, C. and Alberton, O. and Bakker, M. R. and Lohmus, K. and Majdi, H. and Metcalfe, Dan and Olsthoorn, A. F. M. and Pronk, A. and Vanguelova, E. and Weih, M. and Brunner, I.},
  issn         = {1126-3504},
  keyword      = {environmental conditions,fertilization,fine root morphology,indicator,specific root length,stress},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {426--442},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Plant Biosystems},
  title        = {Specific root length as an indicator of environmental change},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11263500701626069},
  volume       = {141},
  year         = {2007},
}