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The adaptive background of nannandry: dwarf male distribution and fertilization in the moss Homalothecium lutescens

Rosengren, Frida LU and Cronberg, Nils LU (2014) In Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 113(1). p.74-84
Abstract
Dwarf males (nannandry) occur in many unrelated, mostly aquatic, groups of organisms. Among land plants they are unique to bryophytes. In this study our aim was to explain variation in frequency of dwarf males and fertilization within populations in the moss Homalothecium lutescens. We compared parameters related to dwarf male presence and sporophyte production in 90 colonies from three localities. Dwarf male density was positively associated with colony moisture at two of the localities, suggesting increased spore germination and dwarf male survival with moist conditions. At one of these localities, dwarf male density was also positively associated with the presence of perichaetia (female sexual branches). Dwarf male density and... (More)
Dwarf males (nannandry) occur in many unrelated, mostly aquatic, groups of organisms. Among land plants they are unique to bryophytes. In this study our aim was to explain variation in frequency of dwarf males and fertilization within populations in the moss Homalothecium lutescens. We compared parameters related to dwarf male presence and sporophyte production in 90 colonies from three localities. Dwarf male density was positively associated with colony moisture at two of the localities, suggesting increased spore germination and dwarf male survival with moist conditions. At one of these localities, dwarf male density was also positively associated with the presence of perichaetia (female sexual branches). Dwarf male density and fertilization frequency were positively associated in two of the localities. Furthermore, in one population, fertilization was also positively associated with canopy cover, which could be attributed to improved nutrient status as a result of throughfall, increased sperm-dispersal efficiency because of larger water drops, or more favourable moisture conditions as a result of shading. Nannandry thus appears to strongly reduce the problem of short fertilization distances in bryophytes, but the presence of water is still critical because the dwarf males are dependent on a certain level of humidity for recruitment and/or development. (C) 2014 The Linnean Society of London, (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bryophytes, fertilization, phyllodioicy, sexual reproduction, sporophytes
in
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
volume
113
issue
1
pages
74 - 84
publisher
Linnean Society of London
external identifiers
  • wos:000340585700006
  • scopus:84906266454
ISSN
0024-4066
DOI
10.1111/bij.12332
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
82f70ab3-ba1b-4932-b1bf-3ce9e29cc9a9 (old id 4648884)
date added to LUP
2014-09-24 08:44:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:16:37
@article{82f70ab3-ba1b-4932-b1bf-3ce9e29cc9a9,
  abstract     = {Dwarf males (nannandry) occur in many unrelated, mostly aquatic, groups of organisms. Among land plants they are unique to bryophytes. In this study our aim was to explain variation in frequency of dwarf males and fertilization within populations in the moss Homalothecium lutescens. We compared parameters related to dwarf male presence and sporophyte production in 90 colonies from three localities. Dwarf male density was positively associated with colony moisture at two of the localities, suggesting increased spore germination and dwarf male survival with moist conditions. At one of these localities, dwarf male density was also positively associated with the presence of perichaetia (female sexual branches). Dwarf male density and fertilization frequency were positively associated in two of the localities. Furthermore, in one population, fertilization was also positively associated with canopy cover, which could be attributed to improved nutrient status as a result of throughfall, increased sperm-dispersal efficiency because of larger water drops, or more favourable moisture conditions as a result of shading. Nannandry thus appears to strongly reduce the problem of short fertilization distances in bryophytes, but the presence of water is still critical because the dwarf males are dependent on a certain level of humidity for recruitment and/or development. (C) 2014 The Linnean Society of London,},
  author       = {Rosengren, Frida and Cronberg, Nils},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  keyword      = {bryophytes,fertilization,phyllodioicy,sexual reproduction,sporophytes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {74--84},
  publisher    = {Linnean Society of London},
  series       = {Biological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  title        = {The adaptive background of nannandry: dwarf male distribution and fertilization in the moss Homalothecium lutescens},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12332},
  volume       = {113},
  year         = {2014},
}