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Occupations that People with Late Effects of Polio Perceive Difficult to Perform

Appelin, Katja; Lexell, Jan LU and Månsson Lexell, Eva LU (2014) In Occupational Therapy International 21(3). p.98-107
Abstract
The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N=300) were high for importance and... (More)
The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N=300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
activities of daily living, client-centred assessment, COPM, postpoliomyelitis syndrome, rehabilitation
in
Occupational Therapy International
volume
21
issue
3
pages
98 - 107
publisher
Whurr Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000340459400002
  • scopus:84905594921
ISSN
1557-0703
DOI
10.1002/oti.1368
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f88ac36b-0b28-457e-b17a-72889fe2512c (old id 4656230)
date added to LUP
2014-10-01 07:25:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:56:59
@article{f88ac36b-0b28-457e-b17a-72889fe2512c,
  abstract     = {The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N=300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Appelin, Katja and Lexell, Jan and Månsson Lexell, Eva},
  issn         = {1557-0703},
  keyword      = {activities of daily living,client-centred assessment,COPM,postpoliomyelitis syndrome,rehabilitation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {98--107},
  publisher    = {Whurr Publishing},
  series       = {Occupational Therapy International},
  title        = {Occupations that People with Late Effects of Polio Perceive Difficult to Perform},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oti.1368},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2014},
}