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Phenology and its role in carbon dioxide exchange processes in northern peatlands

Kross, Angela S. E.; Roulet, Nigel T.; Moore, Tim R.; Lafleur, Peter M.; Humphreys, Elyn R.; Seaquist, Jonathan LU ; Flanagan, Lawrence B. and Aurela, Mika (2014) In Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences 119(7). p.1370-1384
Abstract
Ecosystem phenology plays an important role in carbon exchange processes and can be derived from continuous records of carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange data. In this study we examined the potential use of phenological indices for characterizing cumulative annual CO2 exchange in four contrasting northern peatland ecosystems. We used the approach of Jonsson and Eklundh (2004) to derive a set of phenological indices based on the daily time series of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R-e), and net ecosystem production (NEP) measured in the four peatland sites. The main objectives of this study were (a) to examine the variation in phenological indices across sites and (b) to determine the relationships among phenological... (More)
Ecosystem phenology plays an important role in carbon exchange processes and can be derived from continuous records of carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange data. In this study we examined the potential use of phenological indices for characterizing cumulative annual CO2 exchange in four contrasting northern peatland ecosystems. We used the approach of Jonsson and Eklundh (2004) to derive a set of phenological indices based on the daily time series of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R-e), and net ecosystem production (NEP) measured in the four peatland sites. The main objectives of this study were (a) to examine the variation in phenological indices across sites and (b) to determine the relationships among phenological indices, environmental conditions, and cumulative annual CO2 exchange. The phenological index used to define the "start of the growing season" showed good potential for differentiation among sites based on their average annual site GPP. Sites with earlier growing seasons had the highest average annual site GPP. The "peak CO2 exchange rate" phenological index performed best in reflecting variations among sites and for estimating annual values of GPP, R-e, and NEP (Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.99, p<0.05 for all.). The phenological indices and annual GPP, R-e, and NEP were sensitive to winter (January-March) and summer (July-September) temperature and precipitation, but correlations, though significant, were weak. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences
volume
119
issue
7
pages
1370 - 1384
publisher
American Geophysical Union
external identifiers
  • wos:000340543000008
  • scopus:84961290339
ISSN
2169-8953
DOI
10.1002/2014JG002666
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95eac6d9-5a33-4213-b8ae-42c2658a96c4 (old id 4659359)
date added to LUP
2014-09-24 15:31:23
date last changed
2017-04-16 03:06:44
@article{95eac6d9-5a33-4213-b8ae-42c2658a96c4,
  abstract     = {Ecosystem phenology plays an important role in carbon exchange processes and can be derived from continuous records of carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange data. In this study we examined the potential use of phenological indices for characterizing cumulative annual CO2 exchange in four contrasting northern peatland ecosystems. We used the approach of Jonsson and Eklundh (2004) to derive a set of phenological indices based on the daily time series of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R-e), and net ecosystem production (NEP) measured in the four peatland sites. The main objectives of this study were (a) to examine the variation in phenological indices across sites and (b) to determine the relationships among phenological indices, environmental conditions, and cumulative annual CO2 exchange. The phenological index used to define the "start of the growing season" showed good potential for differentiation among sites based on their average annual site GPP. Sites with earlier growing seasons had the highest average annual site GPP. The "peak CO2 exchange rate" phenological index performed best in reflecting variations among sites and for estimating annual values of GPP, R-e, and NEP (Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.99, p&lt;0.05 for all.). The phenological indices and annual GPP, R-e, and NEP were sensitive to winter (January-March) and summer (July-September) temperature and precipitation, but correlations, though significant, were weak.},
  author       = {Kross, Angela S. E. and Roulet, Nigel T. and Moore, Tim R. and Lafleur, Peter M. and Humphreys, Elyn R. and Seaquist, Jonathan and Flanagan, Lawrence B. and Aurela, Mika},
  issn         = {2169-8953},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1370--1384},
  publisher    = {American Geophysical Union},
  series       = {Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences},
  title        = {Phenology and its role in carbon dioxide exchange processes in northern peatlands},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014JG002666},
  volume       = {119},
  year         = {2014},
}