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Do reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer associate with attendance at mammography screening?

Lagerlund, Magdalena LU ; Sontrop, Jessica M and Zackrisson, Sophia LU (2013) In Cancer Causes and Control 24(9). p.1687-1694
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine whether reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer associate with mammography attendance. METHODS: We linked data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study to the Malmö mammography register (Sweden, 1992-2009). We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44-72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry and a total of 69,746 screening invitations. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Models were adjusted for age and other sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: In this study cohort, mammography screening attendance ranged from 87.6 to 94.5 % between calendar years, with an average attendance of 92 %. Higher attendance was found among women who had given birth to fewer... (More)
PURPOSE: To determine whether reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer associate with mammography attendance. METHODS: We linked data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study to the Malmö mammography register (Sweden, 1992-2009). We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44-72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry and a total of 69,746 screening invitations. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Models were adjusted for age and other sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: In this study cohort, mammography screening attendance ranged from 87.6 to 94.5 % between calendar years, with an average attendance of 92 %. Higher attendance was found among women who had given birth to fewer than three children (ORs ranging between 1.15 and 1.37) and had used oral contraceptives (OC) within the last decade (OR = 1.22, 95 % CI 1.07-1.38) and for a longer period (OR = 1.13, 95 % CI 1.01-1.27). A lower odds of attendance was found among post-menopausal women (OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.77-0.96). Age <13 at menarche, age ≥30 at first childbirth, age ≥55 at menopause, age <20 at first OC use, nulliparity, breastfeeding, and hormone replacement therapy were not associated with mammography attendance. CONCLUSION: Reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer have little effect on mammography screening attendance. This may indicate a potential for under-screening of some women at higher risk. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Causes and Control
volume
24
issue
9
pages
1687 - 1694
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000322879200006
  • pmid:23737028
  • scopus:84881546045
  • pmid:23737028
ISSN
1573-7225
DOI
10.1007/s10552-013-0243-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
467282bb-99d0-4c2b-be5c-c6f7a78c95cf (old id 3913732)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23737028?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 09:55:03
date last changed
2020-01-05 03:38:24
@article{467282bb-99d0-4c2b-be5c-c6f7a78c95cf,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To determine whether reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer associate with mammography attendance. METHODS: We linked data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study to the Malmö mammography register (Sweden, 1992-2009). We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44-72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry and a total of 69,746 screening invitations. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Models were adjusted for age and other sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: In this study cohort, mammography screening attendance ranged from 87.6 to 94.5 % between calendar years, with an average attendance of 92 %. Higher attendance was found among women who had given birth to fewer than three children (ORs ranging between 1.15 and 1.37) and had used oral contraceptives (OC) within the last decade (OR = 1.22, 95 % CI 1.07-1.38) and for a longer period (OR = 1.13, 95 % CI 1.01-1.27). A lower odds of attendance was found among post-menopausal women (OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.77-0.96). Age &lt;13 at menarche, age ≥30 at first childbirth, age ≥55 at menopause, age &lt;20 at first OC use, nulliparity, breastfeeding, and hormone replacement therapy were not associated with mammography attendance. CONCLUSION: Reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer have little effect on mammography screening attendance. This may indicate a potential for under-screening of some women at higher risk.},
  author       = {Lagerlund, Magdalena and Sontrop, Jessica M and Zackrisson, Sophia},
  issn         = {1573-7225},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1687--1694},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cancer Causes and Control},
  title        = {Do reproductive and hormonal risk factors for breast cancer associate with attendance at mammography screening?},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/1385307/4146932.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1007/s10552-013-0243-8},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2013},
}