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Variation in cell volume and community composition of bacteria in response to temperature

Sjöstedt, Johanna LU ; Hagstrom, Ake and Zweifel, U. L. (2012) In Aquatic Microbial Ecology 66(3). p.237-246
Abstract
Although temperature is a key parameter controlling the activity and growth of all microorganisms, information about how water temperature may structure the bacterioplankton community is not consistent. We examined the relationship between temperature and the community composition, cell volume, and morphology of marine bacterioplankton in 4 continuous cultures harbouring multispecies communities. All 4 cultures were maintained at a turnover time of 0.04 h(-1) but at different temperatures of 10, 15, 20, and 25 degrees C. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses showed that the community composition shifted in response to temperature. Cell volumes were determined from digital photomicrographs using an image analysis program, which... (More)
Although temperature is a key parameter controlling the activity and growth of all microorganisms, information about how water temperature may structure the bacterioplankton community is not consistent. We examined the relationship between temperature and the community composition, cell volume, and morphology of marine bacterioplankton in 4 continuous cultures harbouring multispecies communities. All 4 cultures were maintained at a turnover time of 0.04 h(-1) but at different temperatures of 10, 15, 20, and 25 degrees C. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses showed that the community composition shifted in response to temperature. Cell volumes were determined from digital photomicrographs using an image analysis program, which also allowed the identification of 3 morphological types of bacteria: cocci-, rod-, and vibrio-shaped bacteria. Mean bacterial cell volume decreased with increasing temperature, e.g., by 39% when the temperature was increased from 10 degrees C to 20 degrees C. When the temperature increased, the bacterial morphology also shifted from dominance by rod- and vibrio-shaped bacteria to dominance by coccoid bacteria. The results clearly indicate the potential role of temperature in driving the community succession of bacterioplankton and in selecting for smaller cells at higher temperatures. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Temperature, Cell volume, Bacterioplankton, Morphology, dissolved organic-carbon, gradient gel-electrophoresis, escherichia-coli, bacterioplankton assemblages, seasonal-variation, marine-bacteria, ribosomal-rna, growth, size, sea
in
Aquatic Microbial Ecology
volume
66
issue
3
pages
237 - 246
publisher
Inter-Research
external identifiers
  • scopus:84863901944
ISSN
0948-3055
DOI
10.3354/ame01579
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
1193b3b6-4dca-457b-a6e5-1fa7e12803ee (old id 4690169)
date added to LUP
2014-09-29 16:01:09
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:46:22
@article{1193b3b6-4dca-457b-a6e5-1fa7e12803ee,
  abstract     = {Although temperature is a key parameter controlling the activity and growth of all microorganisms, information about how water temperature may structure the bacterioplankton community is not consistent. We examined the relationship between temperature and the community composition, cell volume, and morphology of marine bacterioplankton in 4 continuous cultures harbouring multispecies communities. All 4 cultures were maintained at a turnover time of 0.04 h(-1) but at different temperatures of 10, 15, 20, and 25 degrees C. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses showed that the community composition shifted in response to temperature. Cell volumes were determined from digital photomicrographs using an image analysis program, which also allowed the identification of 3 morphological types of bacteria: cocci-, rod-, and vibrio-shaped bacteria. Mean bacterial cell volume decreased with increasing temperature, e.g., by 39% when the temperature was increased from 10 degrees C to 20 degrees C. When the temperature increased, the bacterial morphology also shifted from dominance by rod- and vibrio-shaped bacteria to dominance by coccoid bacteria. The results clearly indicate the potential role of temperature in driving the community succession of bacterioplankton and in selecting for smaller cells at higher temperatures.},
  author       = {Sjöstedt, Johanna and Hagstrom, Ake and Zweifel, U. L.},
  issn         = {0948-3055},
  keyword      = {Temperature,Cell volume,Bacterioplankton,Morphology,dissolved organic-carbon,gradient gel-electrophoresis,escherichia-coli,bacterioplankton assemblages,seasonal-variation,marine-bacteria,ribosomal-rna,growth,size,sea},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {237--246},
  publisher    = {Inter-Research},
  series       = {Aquatic Microbial Ecology},
  title        = {Variation in cell volume and community composition of bacteria in response to temperature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/ame01579},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2012},
}