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A pilot study investigating lactic acid bacterial symbionts from the honeybee in inhibiting human chronic wound pathogens.

Butler, Éile LU ; Öien, Rut LU ; Lindholm, Christina; Olofsson, Tobias LU ; Nilson, Bo LU and Vasquez, Alejandra LU (2016) In International Wound Journal 13(5). p.729-737
Abstract
Treatment and management of chronic wounds is a large burden on the health sector and causes substantial suffering for the patients. We believe that 13 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) symbionts isolated from the honey crop of the honeybee are important players in the antimicrobial action of honey, by producing antimicrobial substances and can be used in combination with heather honey as an effective treatment in wound management. A total of 22 patients with chronic ulcers were included; culture-dependent and molecular-based (MALDI-MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing) techniques were used to identify bacteria from chronic wounds. These clinical isolates were used for in vitro antimicrobial testing with standardised viable LAB and sterilised heather... (More)
Treatment and management of chronic wounds is a large burden on the health sector and causes substantial suffering for the patients. We believe that 13 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) symbionts isolated from the honey crop of the honeybee are important players in the antimicrobial action of honey, by producing antimicrobial substances and can be used in combination with heather honey as an effective treatment in wound management. A total of 22 patients with chronic ulcers were included; culture-dependent and molecular-based (MALDI-MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing) techniques were used to identify bacteria from chronic wounds. These clinical isolates were used for in vitro antimicrobial testing with standardised viable LAB and sterilised heather honey mixture. Twenty of the patients' wounds were polymicrobial and 42 different species were isolated. Patient isolates that were tested in vitro were inhibited by the LAB and honey combination with inhibitory zones comparable with different antibiotics. LAB and heather honey in combination presents a new topical option in chronic wound management because of the healing properties of honey, antimicrobial metabolite production from the LAB and their bactericidal effect on common chronic wound pathogens. This new treatment may be a stepping stone towards an alternative solution to antibiotics. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Wound Journal
volume
13
issue
5
pages
729 - 737
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:25196349
  • wos:000387667600073
  • scopus:85021346400
ISSN
1742-481X
DOI
10.1111/iwj.12360
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c09d8fc1-1c46-4d4f-877d-1a3797d58d85 (old id 4692099)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25196349?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-10-04 15:16:41
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:28:17
@article{c09d8fc1-1c46-4d4f-877d-1a3797d58d85,
  abstract     = {Treatment and management of chronic wounds is a large burden on the health sector and causes substantial suffering for the patients. We believe that 13 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) symbionts isolated from the honey crop of the honeybee are important players in the antimicrobial action of honey, by producing antimicrobial substances and can be used in combination with heather honey as an effective treatment in wound management. A total of 22 patients with chronic ulcers were included; culture-dependent and molecular-based (MALDI-MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing) techniques were used to identify bacteria from chronic wounds. These clinical isolates were used for in vitro antimicrobial testing with standardised viable LAB and sterilised heather honey mixture. Twenty of the patients' wounds were polymicrobial and 42 different species were isolated. Patient isolates that were tested in vitro were inhibited by the LAB and honey combination with inhibitory zones comparable with different antibiotics. LAB and heather honey in combination presents a new topical option in chronic wound management because of the healing properties of honey, antimicrobial metabolite production from the LAB and their bactericidal effect on common chronic wound pathogens. This new treatment may be a stepping stone towards an alternative solution to antibiotics.},
  author       = {Butler, Éile and Öien, Rut and Lindholm, Christina and Olofsson, Tobias and Nilson, Bo and Vasquez, Alejandra},
  issn         = {1742-481X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {729--737},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Wound Journal},
  title        = {A pilot study investigating lactic acid bacterial symbionts from the honeybee in inhibiting human chronic wound pathogens.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.12360},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2016},
}