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Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey's antimicrobial and therapeutic activities.

Olofsson, Tobias LU ; Butler, Éile LU ; Markowicz, Pawel LU ; Lindholm, Christina; Larsson, Lennart LU and Vasquez, Alejandra LU (2016) In International Wound Journal 13(5). p.668-679
Abstract
Could honeybees' most valuable contribution to mankind besides pollination services be alternative tools against infections? Today, due to the emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we are facing a new era of searching for alternative tools against infections. Natural products such as honey have been applied against human's infections for millennia without sufficient scientific evidence. A unique lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota was discovered by us, which is in symbiosis with honeybees and present in large amounts in fresh honey across the world. This work investigates if the LAB symbionts are the source to the unknown factors contributing to honey's properties. Hence, we tested the LAB against severe wound pathogens such as... (More)
Could honeybees' most valuable contribution to mankind besides pollination services be alternative tools against infections? Today, due to the emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we are facing a new era of searching for alternative tools against infections. Natural products such as honey have been applied against human's infections for millennia without sufficient scientific evidence. A unique lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota was discovered by us, which is in symbiosis with honeybees and present in large amounts in fresh honey across the world. This work investigates if the LAB symbionts are the source to the unknown factors contributing to honey's properties. Hence, we tested the LAB against severe wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among others. We demonstrate a strong antimicrobial activity from each symbiont and a synergistic effect, which counteracted all the tested pathogens. The mechanisms of action are partly shown by elucidating the production of active compounds such as proteins, fatty acids, anaesthetics, organic acids, volatiles and hydrogen peroxide. We show that the symbionts produce a myriad of active compounds that remain in variable amounts in mature honey. Further studies are now required to investigate if these symbionts have a potential in clinical applications as alternative tools against topical human and animal infections. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Wound Journal
volume
13
issue
5
pages
668 - 679
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:25195876
  • wos:000387667600063
ISSN
1742-481X
DOI
10.1111/iwj.12345
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b19277fb-2413-4f3d-b00e-d126de62537f (old id 4692118)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25195876?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-10-03 23:44:31
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:28:16
@article{b19277fb-2413-4f3d-b00e-d126de62537f,
  abstract     = {Could honeybees' most valuable contribution to mankind besides pollination services be alternative tools against infections? Today, due to the emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we are facing a new era of searching for alternative tools against infections. Natural products such as honey have been applied against human's infections for millennia without sufficient scientific evidence. A unique lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota was discovered by us, which is in symbiosis with honeybees and present in large amounts in fresh honey across the world. This work investigates if the LAB symbionts are the source to the unknown factors contributing to honey's properties. Hence, we tested the LAB against severe wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among others. We demonstrate a strong antimicrobial activity from each symbiont and a synergistic effect, which counteracted all the tested pathogens. The mechanisms of action are partly shown by elucidating the production of active compounds such as proteins, fatty acids, anaesthetics, organic acids, volatiles and hydrogen peroxide. We show that the symbionts produce a myriad of active compounds that remain in variable amounts in mature honey. Further studies are now required to investigate if these symbionts have a potential in clinical applications as alternative tools against topical human and animal infections.},
  author       = {Olofsson, Tobias and Butler, Éile and Markowicz, Pawel and Lindholm, Christina and Larsson, Lennart and Vasquez, Alejandra},
  issn         = {1742-481X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {668--679},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Wound Journal},
  title        = {Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey's antimicrobial and therapeutic activities.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.12345},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2016},
}