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The application of palaeolimnology to evidence-based lake management and conservation : examples from UK lakes

Sayer, Carl; Bennion, Helen; Davidson, Thomas; Burgess, Amy; Clarke, Gina; Hoare, Daniel; Frings, Patrick LU and Hatton-Ellis, Tristian (2012) In Aquatic Conservation 22(2). p.165-180
Abstract
1. To help meet the requirements of water legislation, palaeolimnology has been widely used to establish ‘reference conditions’ and restoration targets for lakes. However, its potential for assessing the necessity and appropriateness of different lake management activities has been less publicized.



2. With reference to selected case studies covering consultancy projects commissioned by UK conservation agencies, this study highlights the important applied role of palaeolimnology. Using varying combinations of diatom, plant macrofossil and cladoceran analysis, the degree, timing and in many cases the likely drivers of ecological change were inferred for several lake sites.



3. From this basis advice was... (More)
1. To help meet the requirements of water legislation, palaeolimnology has been widely used to establish ‘reference conditions’ and restoration targets for lakes. However, its potential for assessing the necessity and appropriateness of different lake management activities has been less publicized.



2. With reference to selected case studies covering consultancy projects commissioned by UK conservation agencies, this study highlights the important applied role of palaeolimnology. Using varying combinations of diatom, plant macrofossil and cladoceran analysis, the degree, timing and in many cases the likely drivers of ecological change were inferred for several lake sites.



3. From this basis advice was given on a range of lake management issues, including the need for sediment removal to combat eutrophication and/or the necessity of other nutrient reduction measures (Case study 1), the depth of sediment to be removed to maximize restoration potential through exposure of dormant banks of characean oospores (Case study 2), the requirement for fish management (Case study 3), and advice regarding fish farm expansion and licensing (Case study 4). Where possible management responses to the recommendations are outlined including any major outcomes.



4. All case studies illustrate the advantages, for lake management and conservation decision-making, of placing current lake ecological conditions in the context of long-term change. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
restoration, macrophytes, nutrient enrichment, aquaculture, sediment removal, macrofossils, diatoms
in
Aquatic Conservation
volume
22
issue
2
pages
165 - 180
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84859439554
ISSN
1052-7613
DOI
10.1002/aqc.2221
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
465598ef-8bf5-4195-a373-399b6c2c3ce9 (old id 4696897)
alternative location
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aqc.2221/abstract
date added to LUP
2015-05-06 15:50:27
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:02:13
@article{465598ef-8bf5-4195-a373-399b6c2c3ce9,
  abstract     = {1. To help meet the requirements of water legislation, palaeolimnology has been widely used to establish ‘reference conditions’ and restoration targets for lakes. However, its potential for assessing the necessity and appropriateness of different lake management activities has been less publicized.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
2. With reference to selected case studies covering consultancy projects commissioned by UK conservation agencies, this study highlights the important applied role of palaeolimnology. Using varying combinations of diatom, plant macrofossil and cladoceran analysis, the degree, timing and in many cases the likely drivers of ecological change were inferred for several lake sites.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
3. From this basis advice was given on a range of lake management issues, including the need for sediment removal to combat eutrophication and/or the necessity of other nutrient reduction measures (Case study 1), the depth of sediment to be removed to maximize restoration potential through exposure of dormant banks of characean oospores (Case study 2), the requirement for fish management (Case study 3), and advice regarding fish farm expansion and licensing (Case study 4). Where possible management responses to the recommendations are outlined including any major outcomes.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
4. All case studies illustrate the advantages, for lake management and conservation decision-making, of placing current lake ecological conditions in the context of long-term change.},
  author       = {Sayer, Carl and Bennion, Helen and Davidson, Thomas and Burgess, Amy and Clarke, Gina and Hoare, Daniel and Frings, Patrick and Hatton-Ellis, Tristian},
  issn         = {1052-7613},
  keyword      = {restoration,macrophytes,nutrient enrichment,aquaculture,sediment removal,macrofossils,diatoms},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {165--180},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Aquatic Conservation},
  title        = {The application of palaeolimnology to evidence-based lake management and conservation : examples from UK lakes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2221},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2012},
}