Advanced

The association between obesity and lethal blood alcohol concentrations: A nationwide register-based study of medicolegal autopsy cases in Sweden.

Wingren, Carl Johan LU and Ottosson, Anders LU (2014) In Forensic Science International 244. p.285-288
Abstract
Obesity is a global problem and in aspects of lethal ethanol intoxications virtually unexplored. The cause of death in ethanol intoxication is generally considered to be suppression of the respiratory function. Previous research indicates that respiratory function is more vulnerable in obese subjects than in those of normal weight. We hypothesized that lethal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is lower in obese subjects compared to those of normal weight. We used the Swedish medicolegal autopsy register and identified all medicolegal autopsy cases in Sweden during the period from 1999 to 2013 (N=79,060), and identified 1545 cases with ethanol intoxication identified as the primary cause of death. We studied the association between body mass... (More)
Obesity is a global problem and in aspects of lethal ethanol intoxications virtually unexplored. The cause of death in ethanol intoxication is generally considered to be suppression of the respiratory function. Previous research indicates that respiratory function is more vulnerable in obese subjects than in those of normal weight. We hypothesized that lethal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is lower in obese subjects compared to those of normal weight. We used the Swedish medicolegal autopsy register and identified all medicolegal autopsy cases in Sweden during the period from 1999 to 2013 (N=79,060), and identified 1545 cases with ethanol intoxication identified as the primary cause of death. We studied the association between body mass index and lethal BAC using logistic regression models that we adjusted using several potential confounders such as age, sex, drugs, and extent of decomposition. We observed an association between obesity and lower lethal BACs. The estimated adjusted odds ratio of the association between obesity and a lethal BAC >3‰, using subjects of normal weight as reference, was 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-0.74. The result indicates that in obese subjects the lethal BAC is lower than in those of normal weight. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Forensic Science International
volume
244
pages
285 - 288
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:25300068
  • wos:000345017000049
  • scopus:84907667569
ISSN
1872-6283
DOI
10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.09.012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6cf1248e-26f1-4a2d-91db-2fc24e30ce50 (old id 4737260)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25300068?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-11-06 19:39:00
date last changed
2017-09-17 03:04:41
@article{6cf1248e-26f1-4a2d-91db-2fc24e30ce50,
  abstract     = {Obesity is a global problem and in aspects of lethal ethanol intoxications virtually unexplored. The cause of death in ethanol intoxication is generally considered to be suppression of the respiratory function. Previous research indicates that respiratory function is more vulnerable in obese subjects than in those of normal weight. We hypothesized that lethal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is lower in obese subjects compared to those of normal weight. We used the Swedish medicolegal autopsy register and identified all medicolegal autopsy cases in Sweden during the period from 1999 to 2013 (N=79,060), and identified 1545 cases with ethanol intoxication identified as the primary cause of death. We studied the association between body mass index and lethal BAC using logistic regression models that we adjusted using several potential confounders such as age, sex, drugs, and extent of decomposition. We observed an association between obesity and lower lethal BACs. The estimated adjusted odds ratio of the association between obesity and a lethal BAC >3‰, using subjects of normal weight as reference, was 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-0.74. The result indicates that in obese subjects the lethal BAC is lower than in those of normal weight.},
  author       = {Wingren, Carl Johan and Ottosson, Anders},
  issn         = {1872-6283},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {285--288},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Forensic Science International},
  title        = {The association between obesity and lethal blood alcohol concentrations: A nationwide register-based study of medicolegal autopsy cases in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.09.012},
  volume       = {244},
  year         = {2014},
}