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Pulse perfusion value predicts eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia: an explorative study.

Enekvist, Bruno LU and Johansson, Anders LU (2015) In Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 29(4). p.461-465
Abstract
The variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphical pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after general anaesthesia. The objective was to investigate whether PV can predict eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia. Prospective, explorative clinical study included 20 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, at Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, from November 2012 to January 2013 scheduled for elective breast tumour surgery. A general anaesthesia was delivered with inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane... (More)
The variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphical pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after general anaesthesia. The objective was to investigate whether PV can predict eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia. Prospective, explorative clinical study included 20 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, at Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, from November 2012 to January 2013 scheduled for elective breast tumour surgery. A general anaesthesia was delivered with inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane anaesthesia to a depth of 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration. Sevoflurane inspiratory and expiratory concentrations were measured. Bispectral index monitoring, PV as measured by pulse oximeter, heart rate and carbon dioxide were registered at before anaesthesia, 15 min after induction (at 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration), at end of surgery and at eye opening at the end of anaesthesia. PV values were lower before anaesthesia and at eye opening compared to at 15 min after induction and at end of surgery (P < 0.05). The reduction of PV between end of surgery and eye opening was 0.76. We conclude that the pulse oximeter PV could be a useful variable to assess the timing of recovery, in terms of eye opening after a general anaesthesia. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
volume
29
issue
4
pages
461 - 465
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:25273626
  • wos:000357127800007
  • scopus:84933674177
ISSN
1573-2614
DOI
10.1007/s10877-014-9623-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
43f19e3a-b949-4f27-9c09-026f94a84188 (old id 4738596)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25273626?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-11-04 19:20:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:20:45
@article{43f19e3a-b949-4f27-9c09-026f94a84188,
  abstract     = {The variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphical pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after general anaesthesia. The objective was to investigate whether PV can predict eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia. Prospective, explorative clinical study included 20 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, at Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, from November 2012 to January 2013 scheduled for elective breast tumour surgery. A general anaesthesia was delivered with inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane anaesthesia to a depth of 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration. Sevoflurane inspiratory and expiratory concentrations were measured. Bispectral index monitoring, PV as measured by pulse oximeter, heart rate and carbon dioxide were registered at before anaesthesia, 15 min after induction (at 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration), at end of surgery and at eye opening at the end of anaesthesia. PV values were lower before anaesthesia and at eye opening compared to at 15 min after induction and at end of surgery (P &lt; 0.05). The reduction of PV between end of surgery and eye opening was 0.76. We conclude that the pulse oximeter PV could be a useful variable to assess the timing of recovery, in terms of eye opening after a general anaesthesia.},
  author       = {Enekvist, Bruno and Johansson, Anders},
  issn         = {1573-2614},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {461--465},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing},
  title        = {Pulse perfusion value predicts eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia: an explorative study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10877-014-9623-1},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2015},
}