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Competitive low-tech manufacturing and challenges for regional policy in the European context – lessons from the Danish experience.

Hansen, Teis LU and Winther, Lars (2014) In Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society 7(3). p.449-470
Abstract
Today, low-tech firms in high-wage countries are focusing on increasing investments in highly skilled labour and advanced machinery, incremental innovation and high value-added niches. Danish policy, however, gives little attention to the new specificities of low-tech manufacturing, and the understanding of innovation in national and regional strategies is dominated by a science-based perspective. There is a strong policy focus on human capital and research and development in manufacturing. Human capital is vital to manufacturing in general, but the latter is of less importance for low-tech firms. Conversely, user–producer interactions and machinery investments, which are critical to low-tech competitiveness, are disregarded by policies.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
regional development, regional policy, low-tech manufacturing, innovation, competitiveness
in
Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
volume
7
issue
3
pages
449 - 470
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000344648900008
  • scopus:84937565883
ISSN
1752-1378
DOI
10.1093/cjres/rsu015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ffbba205-e185-41bb-8c15-d84868742573 (old id 4810462)
date added to LUP
2014-11-21 12:56:10
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:02:27
@article{ffbba205-e185-41bb-8c15-d84868742573,
  abstract     = {Today, low-tech firms in high-wage countries are focusing on increasing investments in highly skilled labour and advanced machinery, incremental innovation and high value-added niches. Danish policy, however, gives little attention to the new specificities of low-tech manufacturing, and the understanding of innovation in national and regional strategies is dominated by a science-based perspective. There is a strong policy focus on human capital and research and development in manufacturing. Human capital is vital to manufacturing in general, but the latter is of less importance for low-tech firms. Conversely, user–producer interactions and machinery investments, which are critical to low-tech competitiveness, are disregarded by policies.},
  author       = {Hansen, Teis and Winther, Lars},
  issn         = {1752-1378},
  keyword      = {regional development,regional policy,low-tech manufacturing,innovation,competitiveness},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {449--470},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society},
  title        = {Competitive low-tech manufacturing and challenges for regional policy in the European context – lessons from the Danish experience.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsu015},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2014},
}