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Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

Jörntell, Henrik LU (2016) In Cerebellum 15(2). p.104-111
Abstract
The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control,... (More)
The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cerebellum
volume
15
issue
2
pages
104 - 111
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • pmid:25417189
  • scopus:84959501367
  • wos:000371813300003
ISSN
1473-4230
DOI
10.1007/s12311-014-0623-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
456ffede-bda8-4f78-b05f-bec76da4e01f (old id 4816259)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25417189?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-12-03 17:32:57
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:42:31
@article{456ffede-bda8-4f78-b05f-bec76da4e01f,
  abstract     = {The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.},
  author       = {Jörntell, Henrik},
  issn         = {1473-4230},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {104--111},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Cerebellum},
  title        = {Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-014-0623-y},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2016},
}