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Long-term effects from bacterial meningitis in childhood and adolescence on postural control.

Petersen, Hannes; Patel, Mitesh LU ; Ingason, Einar F; Einarsson, Einar-Jon LU ; Haraldsson, Asgeir and Fransson, Per-Anders LU (2014) In PLoS ONE 9(11).
Abstract
Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their... (More)
Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
9
issue
11
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • pmid:25405756
  • wos:000347121300020
  • scopus:84915770953
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0112016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f0db664-10a2-4fd8-ac9c-c63a862296ab (old id 4816437)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25405756?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-12-03 14:23:35
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:25:38
@article{8f0db664-10a2-4fd8-ac9c-c63a862296ab,
  abstract     = {Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p&lt;0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied.},
  articleno    = {e112016},
  author       = {Petersen, Hannes and Patel, Mitesh and Ingason, Einar F and Einarsson, Einar-Jon and Haraldsson, Asgeir and Fransson, Per-Anders},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Long-term effects from bacterial meningitis in childhood and adolescence on postural control.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112016},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}