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Four Areas of Engagement Requiring Strengthening in Modern Proteomics Today.

Fehniger, Thomas LU ; Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry; Baker, Mark S and Marko-Varga, György LU (2014) In Journal of Proteome Research 13(12). p.5310-5318
Abstract
The global human proteomics community in 2014 is fully engaged in projects that aim to create a better understanding of human biology and its complexities and to provide products from this new knowledge that will in some way benefit humanity. Human proteomics, like any other scientific enterprise, needs to identify areas of direction and development, both for the near future in completing current research projects and into the long-term for the engagement with even more complex challenges. In this Editorial we highlight and discuss four important areas that we collectively believe require attention and demand a collective response going forward. These four areas are: (1) Provide high-quality standardized, sensitive, specific, quantitative,... (More)
The global human proteomics community in 2014 is fully engaged in projects that aim to create a better understanding of human biology and its complexities and to provide products from this new knowledge that will in some way benefit humanity. Human proteomics, like any other scientific enterprise, needs to identify areas of direction and development, both for the near future in completing current research projects and into the long-term for the engagement with even more complex challenges. In this Editorial we highlight and discuss four important areas that we collectively believe require attention and demand a collective response going forward. These four areas are: (1) Provide high-quality standardized, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and readily accessible protein, peptide, or other biomarkers of health, disease, response to therapy into the approval processes of regulatory agencies (e.g., U.S. Food and Drug Administration; FDA), and obtaining approval from the relevant agencies for their use in a clinical or other testing settings. (2) Implement standard processes for collecting, processing, and storing human clinical samples in biorepositories and enforcement of measures to ensure subject integrity including informed consent for the downstream use of samples and in registrations of subject identities within study databases. (3) Test and validate mass spectrometry technology platforms that hold much promise for creating opportunities for obtaining new important knowledge at levels of detection previously not achievable. (4) Organize clinical discovery operations and activities in an intuitive manner to meet the challenges of increased interests in the science we provide and diminishing levels of centrally financed resource and infrastructure support. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Proteome Research
volume
13
issue
12
pages
5310 - 5318
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:25405748
  • wos:000346039400003
  • scopus:84915822559
ISSN
1535-3893
DOI
10.1021/pr500472d
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac00f65f-4bc6-4afa-bc0d-0afb395df0b2 (old id 4816446)
date added to LUP
2014-12-10 10:05:02
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:23:52
@misc{ac00f65f-4bc6-4afa-bc0d-0afb395df0b2,
  abstract     = {The global human proteomics community in 2014 is fully engaged in projects that aim to create a better understanding of human biology and its complexities and to provide products from this new knowledge that will in some way benefit humanity. Human proteomics, like any other scientific enterprise, needs to identify areas of direction and development, both for the near future in completing current research projects and into the long-term for the engagement with even more complex challenges. In this Editorial we highlight and discuss four important areas that we collectively believe require attention and demand a collective response going forward. These four areas are: (1) Provide high-quality standardized, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and readily accessible protein, peptide, or other biomarkers of health, disease, response to therapy into the approval processes of regulatory agencies (e.g., U.S. Food and Drug Administration; FDA), and obtaining approval from the relevant agencies for their use in a clinical or other testing settings. (2) Implement standard processes for collecting, processing, and storing human clinical samples in biorepositories and enforcement of measures to ensure subject integrity including informed consent for the downstream use of samples and in registrations of subject identities within study databases. (3) Test and validate mass spectrometry technology platforms that hold much promise for creating opportunities for obtaining new important knowledge at levels of detection previously not achievable. (4) Organize clinical discovery operations and activities in an intuitive manner to meet the challenges of increased interests in the science we provide and diminishing levels of centrally financed resource and infrastructure support.},
  author       = {Fehniger, Thomas and Boja, Emily S and Rodriguez, Henry and Baker, Mark S and Marko-Varga, György},
  issn         = {1535-3893},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {5310--5318},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Proteome Research},
  title        = {Four Areas of Engagement Requiring Strengthening in Modern Proteomics Today.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr500472d},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2014},
}