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Pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing video-assisted gastrostomy tube placement.

Backman, Torbjörn LU ; Sjövie, Helén; Mellberg, Malin; Börjesson, Anna LU ; Anderberg, Magnus LU ; Kullendorff, Carl-Magnus LU and Arnbjörnsson, Einar LU (2014) In Surgery research and practice 2014.
Abstract
Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children's parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%). One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24%) in the same group of children and... (More)
Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children's parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%). One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24%) in the same group of children and six months after it was found in 40 (22%). There was a difference in vomiting frequency both pre- and postoperatively between the children in the groups with different diagnoses included in the study. No difference was noted in pre- and postoperative vomiting frequency within each specific diagnosis group. Conclusion. The preoperative vomiting symptoms persisted after the VAG operation. Neurologically impaired children had a higher incidence of vomiting than patients with other diagnoses, a well-known fact, probably due to their underlying diagnosis and not the VAG operation. This information is useful in preoperative counselling. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Surgery research and practice
volume
2014
publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
external identifiers
  • pmid:25379563
ISSN
2356-7759
DOI
10.1155/2014/871325
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5a7ca022-0d91-4934-839c-14938e8f0f82 (old id 4820058)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25379563?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-12-01 20:02:48
date last changed
2016-09-20 04:31:21
@article{5a7ca022-0d91-4934-839c-14938e8f0f82,
  abstract     = {Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children's parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%). One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24%) in the same group of children and six months after it was found in 40 (22%). There was a difference in vomiting frequency both pre- and postoperatively between the children in the groups with different diagnoses included in the study. No difference was noted in pre- and postoperative vomiting frequency within each specific diagnosis group. Conclusion. The preoperative vomiting symptoms persisted after the VAG operation. Neurologically impaired children had a higher incidence of vomiting than patients with other diagnoses, a well-known fact, probably due to their underlying diagnosis and not the VAG operation. This information is useful in preoperative counselling.},
  articleno    = {871325},
  author       = {Backman, Torbjörn and Sjövie, Helén and Mellberg, Malin and Börjesson, Anna and Anderberg, Magnus and Kullendorff, Carl-Magnus and Arnbjörnsson, Einar},
  issn         = {2356-7759},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Hindawi Publishing Corporation},
  series       = {Surgery research and practice},
  title        = {Pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing video-assisted gastrostomy tube placement.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/871325},
  volume       = {2014},
  year         = {2014},
}