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Taking care of oneself by regaining control - a key to continue living four to five decades after a suicide attempt in severe depression

Crona, Lisa LU ; Stenmarker, Margaretha; Öjehagen, Agneta LU ; Hallberg, Ulrika and Brådvik, Louise LU (2017) In BMC Psychiatry 17(1). p.1-10
Abstract

Background: Depression is a strong risk factor for suicide and suicide attempt. Several studies have examined the pathway to suicide attempt, but few studies have considered aspects important for overcoming being suicidal. The aim of the present study was to examine personal strategies to continue living after a suicide attempt. Methods: A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Thirteen former inpatients diagnosed with severe depression (1956-1969) participated in a follow-up 42-56 years after their last suicide attempt, which occurred between the ages of 21 and 45. They were interviewed on one occasion between June 2013 and January 2014, using semi-structured interviews. Results: The pathway to a suicide attempt was defined as... (More)

Background: Depression is a strong risk factor for suicide and suicide attempt. Several studies have examined the pathway to suicide attempt, but few studies have considered aspects important for overcoming being suicidal. The aim of the present study was to examine personal strategies to continue living after a suicide attempt. Methods: A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Thirteen former inpatients diagnosed with severe depression (1956-1969) participated in a follow-up 42-56 years after their last suicide attempt, which occurred between the ages of 21 and 45. They were interviewed on one occasion between June 2013 and January 2014, using semi-structured interviews. Results: The pathway to a suicide attempt was defined as 'being trapped in an overwhelming situation'. Three categories described the recovery process: 'coming under professional care', 'experiencing relief in the personal situation', and 'making a decision to continue living'. These categories emerged in a core category, labelled 'taking care of oneself by regaining control'. Overcoming being suicidal occurred regardless of recovering from depression. Conclusion: In the very long-term course following a suicide attempt, the process of recovery is multi-dimensional and fluctuating, and includes appropriate treatment, connecting with others, decision making, and overcoming existential issues.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Grounded theory, Long-term course, Professional care, Qualitative, Severe depression, Suicide attempt
in
BMC Psychiatry
volume
17
issue
1
pages
1 - 10
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85012982894
  • wos:000394820700003
ISSN
1471-244X
DOI
10.1186/s12888-017-1223-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
485dbad1-94eb-4e25-bd81-3b6f4d0e3e8f
date added to LUP
2017-02-27 13:32:55
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:52:58
@article{485dbad1-94eb-4e25-bd81-3b6f4d0e3e8f,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Depression is a strong risk factor for suicide and suicide attempt. Several studies have examined the pathway to suicide attempt, but few studies have considered aspects important for overcoming being suicidal. The aim of the present study was to examine personal strategies to continue living after a suicide attempt. Methods: A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Thirteen former inpatients diagnosed with severe depression (1956-1969) participated in a follow-up 42-56 years after their last suicide attempt, which occurred between the ages of 21 and 45. They were interviewed on one occasion between June 2013 and January 2014, using semi-structured interviews. Results: The pathway to a suicide attempt was defined as 'being trapped in an overwhelming situation'. Three categories described the recovery process: 'coming under professional care', 'experiencing relief in the personal situation', and 'making a decision to continue living'. These categories emerged in a core category, labelled 'taking care of oneself by regaining control'. Overcoming being suicidal occurred regardless of recovering from depression. Conclusion: In the very long-term course following a suicide attempt, the process of recovery is multi-dimensional and fluctuating, and includes appropriate treatment, connecting with others, decision making, and overcoming existential issues.</p>},
  articleno    = {69},
  author       = {Crona, Lisa and Stenmarker, Margaretha and Öjehagen, Agneta and Hallberg, Ulrika and Brådvik, Louise},
  issn         = {1471-244X},
  keyword      = {Grounded theory,Long-term course,Professional care,Qualitative,Severe depression,Suicide attempt},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Psychiatry},
  title        = {Taking care of oneself by regaining control - a key to continue living four to five decades after a suicide attempt in severe depression},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12888-017-1223-4},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2017},
}