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Neurobiology: Jumping Spiders Getting On Board

Heinze, Stanley LU (2014) In Current Biology 24(21). p.1042-1044
Abstract
A new technique has overcome decades of failure to allow, for the first time, electrophysiological access to the brains of jumping spiders, a group of animals renowned for generating highly complex, seemingly vertebrate-like behavior from their tiny arthropod brains.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Current Biology
volume
24
issue
21
pages
1042 - 1044
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000344171500009
  • pmid:25517367
  • scopus:84913600647
ISSN
1879-0445
DOI
10.1016/j.cub.2014.09.041
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b0b08e2b-4e92-4d16-a0a8-642659a711d3 (old id 4875011)
date added to LUP
2014-12-30 15:25:59
date last changed
2017-04-02 03:16:45
@misc{b0b08e2b-4e92-4d16-a0a8-642659a711d3,
  abstract     = {A new technique has overcome decades of failure to allow, for the first time, electrophysiological access to the brains of jumping spiders, a group of animals renowned for generating highly complex, seemingly vertebrate-like behavior from their tiny arthropod brains.},
  author       = {Heinze, Stanley},
  issn         = {1879-0445},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {21},
  pages        = {1042--1044},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Current Biology},
  title        = {Neurobiology: Jumping Spiders Getting On Board},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.09.041},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2014},
}