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Simulation of CO2 and Attribution Analysis at Six European Peatland Sites Using the ECOSSE Model

Abdalla, M.; Hastings, A.; Bell, M. J.; Smith, J. U.; Richards, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Peichl, M.; Lofvenius, M. O.; Lund, Magnus LU and Helfter, C., et al. (2014) In Water, Air and Soil Pollution 225(11). p.2182-2182
Abstract
In this study, we simulated heterotrophic CO2 (Rh) fluxes at six European peatland sites using the ECOSSE model and compared them to estimates of Rh made from eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The sites are spread over four countries with different climates, vegetation and management. Annual Rh from the different sites ranged from 110 to 540 g C m(-2). The maximum annual Rh occurred when the water table (WT) level was between -10 and -25 cm and the air temperature was above 6.2 degrees C. The model successfully simulated seasonal trends for the majority of the sites. Regression relationships (r(2)) between the EC-derived and simulated Rh ranged from 0.28 to 0.76, and the root mean square error and relative error were small, revealing an... (More)
In this study, we simulated heterotrophic CO2 (Rh) fluxes at six European peatland sites using the ECOSSE model and compared them to estimates of Rh made from eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The sites are spread over four countries with different climates, vegetation and management. Annual Rh from the different sites ranged from 110 to 540 g C m(-2). The maximum annual Rh occurred when the water table (WT) level was between -10 and -25 cm and the air temperature was above 6.2 degrees C. The model successfully simulated seasonal trends for the majority of the sites. Regression relationships (r(2)) between the EC-derived and simulated Rh ranged from 0.28 to 0.76, and the root mean square error and relative error were small, revealing an acceptable fit. The overall relative deviation value between annual EC-derived and simulated Rh was small (-1 %) and model efficiency ranges across sites from -0.25 to +0.41. Sensitivity analysis highlighted that increasing temperature, decreasing precipitation and lowering WT depth could significantly increase Rh from soils. Thus, management which lowers the WT could significantly increase anthropogenic CO2, so from a carbon emissions perspective, it should be avoided. The results presented here demonstrate a robust basis for further application of the ECOSSE model to assess the impacts of future land management interventions on peatland carbon emissions and to help guide best practice land management decisions. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Peatland, ECOSSE, Heterotrophic CO2, Attribution analysis
in
Water, Air and Soil Pollution
volume
225
issue
11
pages
2182 - 2182
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000343913200024
  • scopus:84913528891
ISSN
1573-2932
DOI
10.1007/s11270-014-2182-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3378b025-24b2-4757-b441-6257c4d18600 (old id 4876096)
date added to LUP
2014-12-23 09:18:31
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:15:11
@article{3378b025-24b2-4757-b441-6257c4d18600,
  abstract     = {In this study, we simulated heterotrophic CO2 (Rh) fluxes at six European peatland sites using the ECOSSE model and compared them to estimates of Rh made from eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The sites are spread over four countries with different climates, vegetation and management. Annual Rh from the different sites ranged from 110 to 540 g C m(-2). The maximum annual Rh occurred when the water table (WT) level was between -10 and -25 cm and the air temperature was above 6.2 degrees C. The model successfully simulated seasonal trends for the majority of the sites. Regression relationships (r(2)) between the EC-derived and simulated Rh ranged from 0.28 to 0.76, and the root mean square error and relative error were small, revealing an acceptable fit. The overall relative deviation value between annual EC-derived and simulated Rh was small (-1 %) and model efficiency ranges across sites from -0.25 to +0.41. Sensitivity analysis highlighted that increasing temperature, decreasing precipitation and lowering WT depth could significantly increase Rh from soils. Thus, management which lowers the WT could significantly increase anthropogenic CO2, so from a carbon emissions perspective, it should be avoided. The results presented here demonstrate a robust basis for further application of the ECOSSE model to assess the impacts of future land management interventions on peatland carbon emissions and to help guide best practice land management decisions.},
  author       = {Abdalla, M. and Hastings, A. and Bell, M. J. and Smith, J. U. and Richards, M. and Nilsson, M. B. and Peichl, M. and Lofvenius, M. O. and Lund, Magnus and Helfter, C. and Nemitz, E. and Sutton, M. A. and Aurela, M. and Lohila, A. and Laurila, T. and Dolman, A. J. and Belelli-Marchesini, L. and Pogson, M. and Jones, E. and Drewer, J. and Drosler, M. and Smith, P.},
  issn         = {1573-2932},
  keyword      = {Peatland,ECOSSE,Heterotrophic CO2,Attribution analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2182--2182},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Water, Air and Soil Pollution},
  title        = {Simulation of CO2 and Attribution Analysis at Six European Peatland Sites Using the ECOSSE Model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11270-014-2182-8},
  volume       = {225},
  year         = {2014},
}