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Genetic and epigenetic catalysts in early-life programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders.

Estampador, Angela LU and Franks, Paul LU (2014) In Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity : targets and therapy 7. p.575-586
Abstract
Evidence has emerged across the past few decades that the lifetime risk of developing morbidities like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease may be influenced by exposures that occur in utero and in childhood. Developmental abnormalities are known to occur at various stages in fetal growth. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies have sought to delineate developmental processes and plausible risk factors influencing pregnancy outcomes and later health. Whether these observations reflect causal processes or are confounded by genetic and social factors remains unclear, although animal (and some human) studies suggest that epigenetic programming events may be involved. Regardless of the causal basis to observations of... (More)
Evidence has emerged across the past few decades that the lifetime risk of developing morbidities like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease may be influenced by exposures that occur in utero and in childhood. Developmental abnormalities are known to occur at various stages in fetal growth. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies have sought to delineate developmental processes and plausible risk factors influencing pregnancy outcomes and later health. Whether these observations reflect causal processes or are confounded by genetic and social factors remains unclear, although animal (and some human) studies suggest that epigenetic programming events may be involved. Regardless of the causal basis to observations of early-life risk factors and later disease risk, the fact that such associations exist and that they are of a fairly large magnitude justifies further research around this topic. Furthermore, additional information is needed to substantiate public health guidelines on lifestyle behaviors during pregnancy to improve infant health outcomes. Indeed, lifestyle intervention clinical trials in pregnancy are now coming online, where materials and data are being collected that should facilitate understanding of the causal nature of intrauterine exposures related with gestational weight gain, such as elevated maternal blood glucose concentrations. In this review, we provide an overview of these concepts. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity : targets and therapy
volume
7
pages
575 - 586
publisher
Dove Medical Press Ltd.
external identifiers
  • pmid:25489250
  • scopus:84919395161
ISSN
1178-7007
DOI
10.2147/DMSO.S51433
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
93abd6f0-f886-4dd4-bff7-facadbecf5bb (old id 4908753)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25489250?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-01-10 13:44:00
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:55:35
@article{93abd6f0-f886-4dd4-bff7-facadbecf5bb,
  abstract     = {Evidence has emerged across the past few decades that the lifetime risk of developing morbidities like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease may be influenced by exposures that occur in utero and in childhood. Developmental abnormalities are known to occur at various stages in fetal growth. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies have sought to delineate developmental processes and plausible risk factors influencing pregnancy outcomes and later health. Whether these observations reflect causal processes or are confounded by genetic and social factors remains unclear, although animal (and some human) studies suggest that epigenetic programming events may be involved. Regardless of the causal basis to observations of early-life risk factors and later disease risk, the fact that such associations exist and that they are of a fairly large magnitude justifies further research around this topic. Furthermore, additional information is needed to substantiate public health guidelines on lifestyle behaviors during pregnancy to improve infant health outcomes. Indeed, lifestyle intervention clinical trials in pregnancy are now coming online, where materials and data are being collected that should facilitate understanding of the causal nature of intrauterine exposures related with gestational weight gain, such as elevated maternal blood glucose concentrations. In this review, we provide an overview of these concepts.},
  author       = {Estampador, Angela and Franks, Paul},
  issn         = {1178-7007},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {575--586},
  publisher    = {Dove Medical Press Ltd.},
  series       = {Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity : targets and therapy},
  title        = {Genetic and epigenetic catalysts in early-life programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S51433},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2014},
}