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Coveted, detested and unattainable? Images of the US superpower role and self-images of Russia in Russian print media discourse

Edenborg, Emil LU and Petersson, Bo (2011) In International Journal of Cultural Studies 14(1). p.71-89
Abstract
This article explores how the image of the USA has developed in two major Russian daily newspapers, Izvestiya and Komsomolskaya Pravda, in a time period comprised of a total 20 weeks’ of study in the years of 1984, 1994, 2004 and 2009. For Russia this time span was dramatic: it moved from seemingly stable superpower in the 1980s, over the chaos after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, to the partial comeback to great power status at the beginning of the 21st century. While telling the story of how the image of the USA has evolved, the article also describes how Russian self-images have developed. The image projected of the USA was Manichean in the 1980s, whereas the most benevolent images were found in the 1990s. The... (More)
This article explores how the image of the USA has developed in two major Russian daily newspapers, Izvestiya and Komsomolskaya Pravda, in a time period comprised of a total 20 weeks’ of study in the years of 1984, 1994, 2004 and 2009. For Russia this time span was dramatic: it moved from seemingly stable superpower in the 1980s, over the chaos after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, to the partial comeback to great power status at the beginning of the 21st century. While telling the story of how the image of the USA has evolved, the article also describes how Russian self-images have developed. The image projected of the USA was Manichean in the 1980s, whereas the most benevolent images were found in the 1990s. The examples from 2004 and 2009 reflect an assertive Russia that is back on the world stage. The USA is here again often criticized, but also — as before — comprises the scale against which Russia itself is measured. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
images, national identity, newspapers. Russia, self-images, Soviet Union, United States
in
International Journal of Cultural Studies
volume
14
issue
1
pages
71 - 89
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:78651084017
ISSN
1367-8779
DOI
10.1177/1367877910384185
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2e3d9d72-0745-48e8-8f6d-b2f24201e469 (old id 4935195)
date added to LUP
2015-01-16 10:28:40
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:10:55
@article{2e3d9d72-0745-48e8-8f6d-b2f24201e469,
  abstract     = {This article explores how the image of the USA has developed in two major Russian daily newspapers, Izvestiya and Komsomolskaya Pravda, in a time period comprised of a total 20 weeks’ of study in the years of 1984, 1994, 2004 and 2009. For Russia this time span was dramatic: it moved from seemingly stable superpower in the 1980s, over the chaos after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, to the partial comeback to great power status at the beginning of the 21st century. While telling the story of how the image of the USA has evolved, the article also describes how Russian self-images have developed. The image projected of the USA was Manichean in the 1980s, whereas the most benevolent images were found in the 1990s. The examples from 2004 and 2009 reflect an assertive Russia that is back on the world stage. The USA is here again often criticized, but also — as before — comprises the scale against which Russia itself is measured.},
  author       = {Edenborg, Emil and Petersson, Bo},
  issn         = {1367-8779},
  keyword      = {images,national identity,newspapers. Russia,self-images,Soviet Union,United States},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {71--89},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {International Journal of Cultural Studies},
  title        = {Coveted, detested and unattainable? Images of the US superpower role and self-images of Russia in Russian print media discourse},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367877910384185},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2011},
}