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Carbon dioxide exchange of buds and developing shoots of boreal Norway spruce exposed to elevated or ambient CO2 concentration and temperature in whole-tree chambers

Hall, Marianne LU ; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Slaney, Michelle and Wallin, Göran (2009) In Tree Physiology 29(4). p.467-481
Abstract
Effects of ambient and elevated temperature

and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on

CO2 assimilation rate and the structural and phenological

development of shoots during their first growing season

were studied in 45-year-old Norway spruce trees (Picea

abies (L.) Karst.) enclosed in whole-tree chambers.

Continuous measurements of net assimilation rate

(NAR) in individual buds and shoots were made from

early bud development to late August in two consecutive

years. The largest effect of elevated temperature (TE) was

manifest early in the season as an earlier start and

completion of shoot length development, and a... (More)
Effects of ambient and elevated temperature

and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on

CO2 assimilation rate and the structural and phenological

development of shoots during their first growing season

were studied in 45-year-old Norway spruce trees (Picea

abies (L.) Karst.) enclosed in whole-tree chambers.

Continuous measurements of net assimilation rate

(NAR) in individual buds and shoots were made from

early bud development to late August in two consecutive

years. The largest effect of elevated temperature (TE) was

manifest early in the season as an earlier start and

completion of shoot length development, and a 1–3-week

earlier shift from negative to positive NAR compared

with the ambient temperature (TA) treatments. The

largest effect of elevated [CO2] (CE) was found later in

the season, with a 30% increase in maximum NAR

compared with trees in the ambient [CO2] treatments

(CA), and shoots assimilating their own mass in terms of

carbon earlier in the CE treatments than in the CA

treatments. Once the net carbon assimilation compensation

point (NACP) had been reached, TE had little or no

effect on the development of NAR performance, whereas

CE had little effect before the NACP. No interactive

effects of TE and CE on NAR were found. We conclude that in a climate predicted for northern Sweden in 2100, current-year shoots of P. abies will assimilate their own mass in terms of carbon 20–30 days earlier compared with the current climate, and thereby significantly contribute

to canopy assimilation during their first year. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
climate change, NAR, net CO2 assimilation rate, phenology, photosynthesis, Picea abies, shoot development
in
Tree Physiology
volume
29
issue
4
pages
467 - 481
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:74549189142
ISSN
1758-4469
DOI
10.1093/treephys/tpn047
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
76b37de6-4a2e-4e6a-990d-f9220b971ac2 (old id 4936274)
date added to LUP
2015-01-27 14:05:19
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:07:04
@article{76b37de6-4a2e-4e6a-990d-f9220b971ac2,
  abstract     = {Effects of ambient and elevated temperature<br/><br>
and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on<br/><br>
CO2 assimilation rate and the structural and phenological<br/><br>
development of shoots during their first growing season<br/><br>
were studied in 45-year-old Norway spruce trees (Picea<br/><br>
abies (L.) Karst.) enclosed in whole-tree chambers.<br/><br>
Continuous measurements of net assimilation rate<br/><br>
(NAR) in individual buds and shoots were made from<br/><br>
early bud development to late August in two consecutive<br/><br>
years. The largest effect of elevated temperature (TE) was<br/><br>
manifest early in the season as an earlier start and<br/><br>
completion of shoot length development, and a 1–3-week<br/><br>
earlier shift from negative to positive NAR compared<br/><br>
with the ambient temperature (TA) treatments. The<br/><br>
largest effect of elevated [CO2] (CE) was found later in<br/><br>
the season, with a 30% increase in maximum NAR<br/><br>
compared with trees in the ambient [CO2] treatments<br/><br>
(CA), and shoots assimilating their own mass in terms of<br/><br>
carbon earlier in the CE treatments than in the CA<br/><br>
treatments. Once the net carbon assimilation compensation<br/><br>
point (NACP) had been reached, TE had little or no<br/><br>
effect on the development of NAR performance, whereas<br/><br>
CE had little effect before the NACP. No interactive<br/><br>
effects of TE and CE on NAR were found. We conclude that in a climate predicted for northern Sweden in 2100, current-year shoots of P. abies will assimilate their own mass in terms of carbon 20–30 days earlier compared with the current climate, and thereby significantly contribute<br/><br>
to canopy assimilation during their first year.},
  author       = {Hall, Marianne and Räntfors, Mats and Linder, Sune and Slaney, Michelle and Wallin, Göran},
  issn         = {1758-4469},
  keyword      = {climate change,NAR,net CO2 assimilation rate,phenology,photosynthesis,Picea abies,shoot development},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {467--481},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Tree Physiology},
  title        = {Carbon dioxide exchange of buds and developing shoots of boreal Norway spruce exposed to elevated or ambient CO2 concentration and temperature in whole-tree chambers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpn047},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2009},
}