Advanced

Population regulation by habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

Krüger, O.; Chakarov, Nayden LU ; Nielsen, J. T.; Looft, V.; Grünkorn, T.; Struwe-Juhl, B. and Møller, A. P. (2012) In Journal of Animal Ecology 81(2). p.330-340
Abstract
1. The habitat heterogeneity (HHH) and individual adjustment (IAH) hypotheses are commonly proposed to explain a decrease in reproduction rate with increasing population density. Higher numbers of low-quality territories with low reproductive success as density increases lead to a decrease in reproduction under the HHH, while more competition at high density decreases reproduction across all territories under the IAH. 2. We analyse the influence of density and habitat heterogeneity on reproductive success in eight populations of long-lived territorial birds of prey belonging to four species. Sufficient reliability in distinguishing between population-wide, site-specific and individual quality effects on reproduction was granted through the... (More)
1. The habitat heterogeneity (HHH) and individual adjustment (IAH) hypotheses are commonly proposed to explain a decrease in reproduction rate with increasing population density. Higher numbers of low-quality territories with low reproductive success as density increases lead to a decrease in reproduction under the HHH, while more competition at high density decreases reproduction across all territories under the IAH. 2. We analyse the influence of density and habitat heterogeneity on reproductive success in eight populations of long-lived territorial birds of prey belonging to four species. Sufficient reliability in distinguishing between population-wide, site-specific and individual quality effects on reproduction was granted through the minimal duration of 20 years of all data sets and the ability to control for individual quality in five of them. 3. Density increased in five populations but reproduction did not decrease in these. Territory occupancy as a surrogate of territory quality correlated positively with reproductive success but only significantly so in large data sets with more than 100 territories. 4. Reproductive success was always best explained by measures of territory quality in multivariate models. Direct or delayed (t-1) population density entered very few of the best models. Mixed models controlling for individual quality showed an increasing reproductive performance in older individuals and in those laying earlier, but measures of territory quality were also always retained in the best models. 5. We find strong support for the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis but weak support for the individual adjustment hypothesis. Both individual and site characteristics are crucial for reproductive performance in long-lived birds. Proportional occupancy of territories enables recognition of high-quality territories as preferential conservation targets. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
avian, eagle haliaeetus-albicilla, density-dependent fecundity, success, lifetime reproductive, buzzard buteo-buteo, goshawk accipiter-gentilis, territory quality, density, population, long-term studies, birds of prey, intraspecific competition, clutch size, breeding performance, common buzzard, human persecution
in
Journal of Animal Ecology
volume
81
issue
2
pages
330 - 340
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:84856948940
ISSN
1365-2656
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2656.2011.01904.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
46864a01-1fdd-4fd2-9d53-63f21f27e058 (old id 4936935)
date added to LUP
2015-01-22 11:16:57
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:57:55
@article{46864a01-1fdd-4fd2-9d53-63f21f27e058,
  abstract     = {1. The habitat heterogeneity (HHH) and individual adjustment (IAH) hypotheses are commonly proposed to explain a decrease in reproduction rate with increasing population density. Higher numbers of low-quality territories with low reproductive success as density increases lead to a decrease in reproduction under the HHH, while more competition at high density decreases reproduction across all territories under the IAH. 2. We analyse the influence of density and habitat heterogeneity on reproductive success in eight populations of long-lived territorial birds of prey belonging to four species. Sufficient reliability in distinguishing between population-wide, site-specific and individual quality effects on reproduction was granted through the minimal duration of 20 years of all data sets and the ability to control for individual quality in five of them. 3. Density increased in five populations but reproduction did not decrease in these. Territory occupancy as a surrogate of territory quality correlated positively with reproductive success but only significantly so in large data sets with more than 100 territories. 4. Reproductive success was always best explained by measures of territory quality in multivariate models. Direct or delayed (t-1) population density entered very few of the best models. Mixed models controlling for individual quality showed an increasing reproductive performance in older individuals and in those laying earlier, but measures of territory quality were also always retained in the best models. 5. We find strong support for the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis but weak support for the individual adjustment hypothesis. Both individual and site characteristics are crucial for reproductive performance in long-lived birds. Proportional occupancy of territories enables recognition of high-quality territories as preferential conservation targets.},
  author       = {Krüger, O. and Chakarov, Nayden and Nielsen, J. T. and Looft, V. and Grünkorn, T. and Struwe-Juhl, B. and Møller, A. P.},
  issn         = {1365-2656},
  keyword      = {avian,eagle haliaeetus-albicilla,density-dependent fecundity,success,lifetime reproductive,buzzard buteo-buteo,goshawk accipiter-gentilis,territory quality,density,population,long-term studies,birds of prey,intraspecific competition,clutch size,breeding performance,common buzzard,human persecution},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {330--340},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Animal Ecology},
  title        = {Population regulation by habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2011.01904.x},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2012},
}