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Weight Suppression and Body Mass Index Interact to Predict Long-Term Weight Outcomes in Adolescent-Onset Anorexia Nervosa

Witt, Ashley A.; Berkowitz, Staci A.; Gillberg, Christopher; Lowe, Michael R.; Råstam, Maria LU and Wentz, Elisabet (2014) In Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 82(6). p.1207-1211
Abstract
Research on anorexia nervosa (AN) has emphasized the importance of low absolute body weight, but emerging research suggests the importance of also considering low body weight relative to an individual's highest premorbid weight (weight suppression; WS). Objective: We investigated whether body mass index and WS at lowest weight (BMI-LW and WS-LW) among adolescents with AN predicted BMI at 6-, 10-, or 18-year follow-up, duration of AN, or total eating disorder duration, including time during which criteria were met for bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified. Method: Forty-seven cases of AN identified through community screening in Sweden were included. Weight and height data were collected from medical records, school... (More)
Research on anorexia nervosa (AN) has emphasized the importance of low absolute body weight, but emerging research suggests the importance of also considering low body weight relative to an individual's highest premorbid weight (weight suppression; WS). Objective: We investigated whether body mass index and WS at lowest weight (BMI-LW and WS-LW) among adolescents with AN predicted BMI at 6-, 10-, or 18-year follow-up, duration of AN, or total eating disorder duration, including time during which criteria were met for bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified. Method: Forty-seven cases of AN identified through community screening in Sweden were included. Weight and height data were collected from medical records, school nurse charts, and study follow-up assessments. Results: Higher WS-LW was associated with higher BMI at 6-year and 10-year follow-up, and this effect was strongest among those with the lowest BMI-LW values. BMI-LW and WS-LW were positively associated with BMI at 18-year follow-up, but there was no significant interaction. There was no significant association between WS-LW and AN duration or eating disorder duration, although eating disorder duration was longer among those with higher BMI-LW, controlling for WS-LW. Conclusions: Absolute and relative weight status interact to predict weight outcomes in AN over the long term. Results suggest that BMI and WS may be more relevant to the prediction of long-term weight outcomes than to the persistence of other eating disorder symptoms. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
anorexia nervosa, weight suppression, body mass index, outcome
in
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
volume
82
issue
6
pages
1207 - 1211
publisher
American Psychological Association (APA)
external identifiers
  • wos:000345452900025
  • scopus:84956582629
ISSN
0022-006X
DOI
10.1037/a0037484
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b5d9f9e-b979-4a88-b547-185511a26547 (old id 4965946)
date added to LUP
2015-02-03 07:08:23
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:06:44
@article{9b5d9f9e-b979-4a88-b547-185511a26547,
  abstract     = {Research on anorexia nervosa (AN) has emphasized the importance of low absolute body weight, but emerging research suggests the importance of also considering low body weight relative to an individual's highest premorbid weight (weight suppression; WS). Objective: We investigated whether body mass index and WS at lowest weight (BMI-LW and WS-LW) among adolescents with AN predicted BMI at 6-, 10-, or 18-year follow-up, duration of AN, or total eating disorder duration, including time during which criteria were met for bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified. Method: Forty-seven cases of AN identified through community screening in Sweden were included. Weight and height data were collected from medical records, school nurse charts, and study follow-up assessments. Results: Higher WS-LW was associated with higher BMI at 6-year and 10-year follow-up, and this effect was strongest among those with the lowest BMI-LW values. BMI-LW and WS-LW were positively associated with BMI at 18-year follow-up, but there was no significant interaction. There was no significant association between WS-LW and AN duration or eating disorder duration, although eating disorder duration was longer among those with higher BMI-LW, controlling for WS-LW. Conclusions: Absolute and relative weight status interact to predict weight outcomes in AN over the long term. Results suggest that BMI and WS may be more relevant to the prediction of long-term weight outcomes than to the persistence of other eating disorder symptoms.},
  author       = {Witt, Ashley A. and Berkowitz, Staci A. and Gillberg, Christopher and Lowe, Michael R. and Råstam, Maria and Wentz, Elisabet},
  issn         = {0022-006X},
  keyword      = {anorexia nervosa,weight suppression,body mass index,outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1207--1211},
  publisher    = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
  series       = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
  title        = {Weight Suppression and Body Mass Index Interact to Predict Long-Term Weight Outcomes in Adolescent-Onset Anorexia Nervosa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037484},
  volume       = {82},
  year         = {2014},
}