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Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery

Monsen, Christina LU ; Acosta, Stefan LU and Kumlien, Christine (2017) In Journal of Clinical Nursing 26(9-10). p.1405-1413
Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Background: Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. Design: An explorative qualitative study. Methods: Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results: Undergoing negative pressure wound... (More)

Aims and objectives: To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Background: Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. Design: An explorative qualitative study. Methods: Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results: Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Conclusions: Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Content analysis, Postoperative care, Qualitative study, Vascular disease, Wound care
in
Journal of Clinical Nursing
volume
26
issue
9-10
pages
1405 - 1413
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85013501001
ISSN
0962-1067
DOI
10.1111/jocn.13702
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
49792d72-5233-4c51-8964-7134dafac40c
date added to LUP
2017-03-08 14:15:38
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:54:34
@article{49792d72-5233-4c51-8964-7134dafac40c,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims and objectives: To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Background: Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. Design: An explorative qualitative study. Methods: Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results: Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Conclusions: Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home.</p>},
  author       = {Monsen, Christina and Acosta, Stefan and Kumlien, Christine },
  issn         = {0962-1067},
  keyword      = {Content analysis,Postoperative care,Qualitative study,Vascular disease,Wound care},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {9-10},
  pages        = {1405--1413},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Nursing},
  title        = {Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13702},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2017},
}